Resettlement Site Profiles

In order to gain a more complete understanding of refugee resettlement in smaller and mid-sized cities, we built profiles of four cities (parallel sites) in varying regions across the country. The four cities we chose to study were Bowling Green, KY, Dayton, OH, Lincoln, NE, and Richland, WA. We selected these cities as a comparison for our case studies in Vermont. Richland and Bowling Green were selected for their similar size in population and number of settling refugees, while Dayton and Lincoln were chosen as representative mid-sized cities for refugee resettlement. Each profile contains general city statistics, the local resettlement agency, and any secondary organizations in the area that assist in refugee resettlement, as well as an archive of news articles related to refugees in each city. In addition to these profiles, the lead researcher (Pablo Bose) will travel to each site to conduct interviews with local officials involved in their city’s resettlement process. We later included profiles for two other Vermont cities in Colchester, where the Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program is based, and Rutland, a southern Vermont town that is slated to receive 100 Syrian refugees in the Fall of 2016.

Bowling Green, KY

        Kentucky State Coordinators:
State Refugee Coordinator: Becky Jordan
ORR Regional Representative: Faith Hurt
Catholic Charities of Louisville: Lead agency for refugee settlement in KY

  • Kentucky Office for Refugees (KOR): serves as State Refugee Coordinator designated by the ORR; provides leadership and policy, as well as manages funding

  • Migration and Refugee Services (MRS): Provide services and training in assistance of refugee resettlement.

        Background Information:
Population in 2014: 62, 479 (98% Urban, 2% Rural)
Estimated per capita income in 2013: $20,116
Median House or Condo Value: $131,667
Median Gross Rent (2013): $667
Racial Breakdown:

  • White: 72.4% (43,709)

  • Black alone: 15.2% (9,175)

  • Hispanic: 6% (3,974)

  • Asian alone: 3.7% (2,204)

  • Two or more races: 2.0% (1,193)

  • American Indian alone: 0.4% (84)

  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone: 0.02% (12)

  • Other Race alone: 0.01% (8)

Land Area: 35.4 square miles
Population Density: 1,765 per square mile (low)
FBP: 10.8% (State Average: 3.4%)
Unemployment Rate (September 2015): 3.8% (State Average: 4.6%)
Most Common Industries:

  • Manufacturing: 19%

  • Retail Trade: 16%

  • Accommodation and Food Services: 11%

  • Educational Services: 11%

Local Agency Responsible for Settlement of Refugees:

International Center of Kentucky (Bowling Green, KY, 42101)
Director: Albert Mbanfu
Case Manager: Manita Tamang
About: The International Center operates as a Matching Grant Program from the KOR. Started in 1981 by Marty Deputy, this organization has helped to resettle over 10,000 refugees, victims of human trafficking, asylees, parolees, and others with similar status, as well as other immigrants from thirty countries around the globe. Working closely with the Department of State and the US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, the International Center, The International Center of Kentucky works to assist new arrivals in assimilating and integrating into their new communities through offering employment, educational, housing, and language programs.

Some Services Include:

  • Airport Pick-up

  • Food, clothing, and safe housing upon arrival

  • Employment services + Registration for Social Security Cards

  • Enrollment of children into schools

  • Enrollment of adults in ELL courses

  • Community and cultural orientation

  • Interpretation and transportation assistance

  • Assistance in reaching self-sufficiency within 180 days

Country of Origin

#Settled 2002-2015

Azerbaijan

40

Bhutan

158

Bosnia & Herzegovina

90

Burma

1,777

Burundi

123

Columbia

25

Cuba

197

Dem. Rep. of Congo

124

Iraq

411

Ivory Coast

6

Liberia

81

Pakistan

8

Russia

171

Rwanda

8

Serbia

24

Somalia

247

Ukraine

1

Vietnam

43

Total

3,534

Secondary Organizations:

The Center for Development, Acculturation & Resolution Services [CEDARS] through Holy Spirit Catholic Church (Targeted Assistance Grant Program of KOR)

Bowling Green, KY 42104 (Parish)
Leadership: Jennifer Bell, Founder & Director
What They Do:

  • Drivers’ education classes

  • Group Counseling

  • Life-skill education

  • Cultural and Civic Development

  • Community integration services involving advocacy and cultural awareness to bridge cultural gaps within the community

Community Action of Southern Kentucky [CASOKY] (Targeted Assistance Grant Program of KOR)
Bowling Green, KY 42101 (Education and Human Service Building)
Leadership: Melissa Weaver, CEO/Executive Director
What They Do:

  • Provide employment and training services for eligible refugees placed in the US with 5 years

  • Intended to match participating refugee with employment that matches their skills and assets

  • Job preparations workshops

  • Financial assistance for transportation, vocational training, and other employment-related expenses

WKU ALIVE Center (Targeted Assistance Grant Program of KOR)
Bowling Green, KY 42101
Leadership: Leah Ashwill, Director
What They Do:

  • Facilitate collaborative efforts addressing local, regional, and global issues through building campus and community partnerships

  • Refugee Craft Cooperative (with CEDARS): Work with local Bowling Green refugee community organizations and artisans to foster alternative opportunities to generate income for refugee families. This program also works to build community relationships and value folk art traditions of refugee communities.

  • Cross-Cultural Transitions: Burmese Refugees in America (with Holy Spirit Catholic Church and International Center): Gain in-sight into the real life experience refugees who have arrived from what was formerly recognized as Burma.

  • Multicultural Service-Learning with Immigrant and Refugee Families (with International Center, CEDARS and other community organizations: Aided a cultural diversity service-learning course working with refugee populations in Bowling Green

Food for All Community Garden
Bowling Green, KY 42104 (Holy Apostles Orthodox Church)
What They Do:

  • A non-profit collaboration between HOTEL INC and Holy Apostles Orthodox Mission

  • Utilize a half-acre space to provide fresh produce for HOTEL INC’s food pantry and for the Refugee CSA organized by the Community Farmers Market

  • Also offer cooking and gardening classes

Newspaper Articles:

“Immigration Population Swells”
Written by Laurel Wilson: lwilson@bgdailynews.com
June 15, 2014
Discusses how the large of number of refugees in Bowling Green is affecting the community, and how community organizations have worked to help these populations. Also includes quotes from Albert Mbanfu, CEO of the International Center, on how refugees are integrating into the community and the benefits it has for all citizens and the city’s economy.
http://www.bgdailynews.com/news/immigrant-population-swells/article_7fd05858-de1b-5101-aa69-32a1655a1e67.html

“Groups decide to resettle 40 Syrians in Bowling Green”
Written by Aaron Mudd
April 20, 2016
Discusses the debate in Bowling Green surrounding the proposed settlement of 40 Syrian refugees in the coming October. The article touches on fears of community members regarding the refugee screening process, and also advocates for why Bowling Green should be accepting Syrians into their community.
http://www.bgdailynews.com/news/groups-decide-to-resettle-syrians-in-bowling-green/article_32b6b818-7857-5afc-8341-8017f306b28b.html

“Bowling Green's refugees celebrate community”
Written by Aaron Mudd
June 25, 2016
Brief article discussing the community’s celebration of World Refugee Day.
http://www.bgdailynews.com/news/bowling-green-s-refugees-celebrate-community/article_0f634652-7633-543b-9549-e26f492493fb.html

“Bowling Green, KY and The Nascent Stages of Religious Diversity”
Written by N.A., The Pluralism Project- Harvard University
Explores the state of growing religious diversity in Bowling Green as a result of the influx of refugees and migrants in an area historically defined by a heavy presence of Christianity.
http://pluralism.org/research-report/bowling-green-ky-and-the-nascent-stages-of-religious-diversity/

“Proposal could allow up to 40 Syrian refugees into Bowling Green”
Written by Whitney Davis
April 21, 2016
Discusses the lack of consensus on the new proposal to accept around 40 Syrian refugees, with reasons against claiming an inefficient screening process for Syrians entering the country.
http://www.wbko.com/content/news/Proposal-could-allow-up-to-40-Syrian-refugees-into-Bowling-Green-376610701.html

“Bowling Green's Muslim community growing, changing”
Written by Jenna Mink
June 30, 2012
Tells the story of a new Mosque opened by the Bosnian community in Bowling Green, as well as discussing some of the cultural differences between the Bosnian Mosque and the local Islamic center. The article also touches on some of the positive and negative aspects of the new mosque opening.
http://www.kentucky.com/living/religion/article44366508.html


Dayton, OH

Ohio State Coordinators:

State Refugee Coordinator: Jennifer R. Johnson 
State Refugee Health Coordinator: Sandra Hollingsworth 
ORR Regional Representative: Chandra Allgood Foster 

 

        Background Information:
Population in 2014: 141,003 (100% urban, 0% rural)
Estimated per capita income in 2013: $28,965
Median House or Condo Value: $66,200
Median Gross Rent: $617
Racial Breakdown:

    • White: 51.5%

    • Hispanic: 3.8%

    • Asian alone: 1.1%

    • Two or more races: 2.9%

    • Black alone: 40.3%

    • American Indian alone: 0.3%

    • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone: 0.02%

Land Area: 55.8 square miles
Population Density: 2,528 people per square mile (average)
FBP: 3.8% (State Average: 4.1%)
Unemployment Rate (September 2015): 5.2% (State Average: 4.3%)
Most Common Industries:

    • Manufacturing: 18%

    • Retail Trade: 12%

    • Public Administration: 8%

    • Accommodation and Food Services: 8%

        Local Agency Responsible for Settlement of Refugees:
Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley
Director: Laura Jordan Roesch
About: Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley settles around 200-250 refugees each year in the greater Dayton area. They arrange housing, help refugees find work, and provide other aid.

Some services include:

      • Cultural Orientation Overview

      • Employment Assistance

      • ESOL Services

      • Medical Services

Country of Origin

#Settled 2002-2015

Afghanistan

1

Bhutan

96

Burma

17

Burundi

99

Columbia

50

Congo

7

Dem. Rep. of Congo

227

Eritrea

186

Etheopia

89

Iraq

364

Ivory Coast

2

Kenya

1

Liberia

29

Pakistan

2

Russia

60

Rwanda

54

Serbia

3

Sierra Leone

12

Somalia

2

Sudan

140

Togo

7

Tunisia

1

Vietnam

38

Zimbabwe

2

Total

1,487

Note: Settlement numbers are for Dayton only, not including greater area (Kettering, etc.)
Secondary Organizations: (Full list at http://www.welcomedayton.org/resources/community-resources/)

Secondary Organizations:

Human Relations Council
Dayton, OH 45402
Leadership:

    • Catherine Crosby, Executive Director

    • Melissa Bertolo, Welcome Dayton Program Coordinator

    • Eugeine Kirenga, Immigration Resource Specialist

    • Martha Jeanette Rodriguez, Immigration Resource Specialist

What They Do:

    • Enforce civil rights

    • Provide business and technical assistance to minority-owned, woman-owned, and small disadvantaged businesses

    • Administer community relations initiatives like Welcome Dayton

East End Community Services
Dayton, OH 45410
Leadership:

    • Jan Lepore-Jentleson, Executive Director

What They Do:

    • Multilingual staff help immigrants and refugees find housing, employment, food, and health resources

Ethnic and Cultural Diversity Caucus
Dayton, OH 45402
Leadership:

    • Theo Majka, Director

What They Do:

    • Advocacy group affiliated with National Conference for Community and Justice of Greater Dayton

    • Promote and administer anti-discrimination and social justice campaigns that address structural inequalities

Hispanic Catholic Ministry
Dayton, OH 45410
Leadership:

    • Sister Maria Stacy, Director

What They Do:

    • Provide English classes

    • Organize prayer groups

    • Connect Hispanic individuals with legal services, religious resources, and social supports

Kettering ABLE
Kettering, OH 45429
Leadership:

    • Katie Miller, Program Coordinator

What They Do:

    • ABLE: Adult Basic Literacy Education

    • Offer ESOL classes including “Business English” classes

    • Offer GED classes

Latino Connection
Dayton, OH 45404
Leadership:

    • Joseph Smith, President

What They Do:

    • Provides information, networking, and training opportunities to individuals helping the greater Dayton area Latino population

American Friends Service Committee
Dayton, OH 45406
Leadership:

    • Migwe Kimemia, Program Director

What They Do:

    • Promote immigrant entrepreneurship by formulating conflict-free trade principles among Dayton consumers

    • Civic engagement at local and state levels to implement Welcome Dayton policies and the Ohio General Assembly’s New African Immigrants Commission policies that serve Sub-Saharan African communities in Ohio

Newspaper Articles:

“City Oks immigrant-friendly plan unanimously Dayton commission aims to foster diversity”
Written by Jeremy P. Kelley
October 6, 2011
Discusses City Commission’s approval of the Welcome Dayton plan. Touches on opposition from black residents, Ohio Jobs and Justice PAC. Reasoning for opposition: local police shouldn’t make immigration decisions, alludes to sanctuary city debate. Black residents feel that the same welcome hasn’t been extended to them.
http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/news/local/city-oks-immigrant-friendly-plan-unanimously/nMwPd/

“Dayton considers immigrant IDs: The city cites safety, while opponents say it is coddling immigrants”
Written by Joanne Huist Smith
October 20, 2011
Describes city’s consideration in issuing municipal IDs to residents without any other form of ID, regardless of immigration status. Cites New Haven as success story that focused on safety and sense of welcome, and San Francisco with security feature enhanced ID cards to protect against fraud/counterfeiting
http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/news/local/dayton-considers-immigrant-ids/nMwgK/

“Welcome to Dayton? What the Welcome Dayton Plan contains – and what it doesn’t”
Written by Mayor Gary Leitzell
November 1, 2011
Former mayor’s response to dissidents of Welcome Dayton plan: explains that the plan doesn’t include ‘sanctuary city’ rhetoric. He claims its purpose is to create jobs with “America’s legal immigrant entrepreneurs.” His stance stands at odds with current Mayor Whaley’s stance on illegal immigration.
http://www.daytoncitypaper.com/welcome-to-dayton/

“Dayton, Ohio, Welcomes Immigrants As Policy Point”
Written by Dan Sewell, AP
December 25, 2011
Overview of reactions to Welcome Dayton approval. Situates Dayton in the context of postindustrial economic recession. Immigrants portrayed as ‘underutilized resource.’ Includes opponents’ expressions of disproval in contrast with many immigrants’ expressions of support/relief.
http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20111030/news/710309972/

“Immigrants Welcomed: A City Sees Economic Promise”
Written by Emily McCord
December 26, 2012
Describes Dayton’s immigrant friendly framework: investment in community, immigrants largely seen as a positive (economic) force. Touches on concerns that Dayton is becoming a sanctuary city.
http://www.npr.org/2012/12/22/167797730/immigrants-welcomed-a-city-sees-economic-promise

“Dayton mayor’s comments on immigration draw fire”
Written by Cornelius Frolik: 937-225-0749
July 17, 2014
Describes Mayor Whaley’s declaration that Dayton will accept illegal immigrants, her stance on the distribution of social services, as well as community members’ (largely positive) vs. out of towners’ (largely negative) response.
http://www.whio.com/news/news/local/dayton-mayors-comments-immigration-draw-fire/nghjD/

“House bill on immigrants could cost Dayton money”
Written by Jeremy P. Kelley; 937-225-2278
July 23, 2015
Discusses implications of US House bill on Dayton if passed. Limits federal funding to cities that do not enforce federal immigration laws. Cites Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl objecting to the bill because it would harm ties between law enforcement and immigrant communities.
http://www.mydaytondailynews.com/news/news/house-bill-on-immigrants-could-cost-dayton-money/nm5np/

“Residents speak in support of welcoming refugees”
Written by Cornelius Frolik; 937-225-0749
November 25, 2015
Regarding Mayor Whaley’s statements about welcoming Syrian refugees toDayton, residents largely showed their support during the public input portion of the City Commission meeting.
http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/news/residents-speak-in-support-welcoming-refugees/npWcr/

“Welcome Dayton program under fire again”
Written by Lynn Hulsey; 937-225-7455
March 22, 2016
Discusses the resurfacing of the sanctuary city debate following the terrorist attacks in Belgium. Montgomery County Sheriff Phil Plummer (also chair of the Montgomery County Republican Party) expresses concern for letting immigrants into Dayton who “have not been vetted properly by the federal system,” while city officials including the Welcome Dayton program coordinator and Mayor Whaley renounce this view. This article highlights the county-city divide in immigration related politics.
http://www.mydaytondailynews.com/news/news/local-govt-politics/welcome-dayton-program-under-fire-again/nqqnM/


Richland, WA

Washington State Coordinators:

State Refugee Coordinator: Monica Hamilton
ORR Regional Representative: Pierrot Rugaba

        Background Information:
Population in 2014: 53,019 (99% urban, 1% rural)
Estimated per capita income in 2013: $58,405
Median House or Condo Value: $195,477
Median Gross Rent: $899
Racial Breakdown:

  • White: 81%

  • Hispanic: 9.8%

  • Asian alone: 4.7%

  • Two or more races: 2.6%

  • Black alone: 0.8%

  • American Indian alone: 0.7%

  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone: 0.2%

Land Area: 34.8 square miles
Population Density: 1,505 people per square mile (low)
FBP: 8.1% (State Average: 13.5%)
Unemployment Rate (September 2015): 5.1% (State Average: 4.8%)
Most Common Industries:

  • Professional, scientific, and technical services: 22%

  • Construction: 13%

  • Retail Trade: 11%

  • Manufacturing: 8%

        Local Agency Responsible for Settlement of Refugees:
World Relief Tri-Cities
Director: Scott Michael
About: World Relief Tri-Cities settles around 225 refugees each year in the Tri-Cities, which includes Richland, Pasco, and Kennewick. They arrange housing, help refugees find work, and provide other aid.

Some services include:

  • Volunteer Mentor Program

  • Reception & Placement: Orientation

  • Employment

  • Medical Assistance

  • Immigration Assistance

  • Social Services

Country of Origin

#Settled 2002-2015

Afghanistan

5

Azerbaijan

4

Bhutan

6

Burma

280

China

1

Columbia

81

Cuba

184

Dem. Rep. of Congo

1

Congo

1

Iraq

186

Liberia

2

Moldova

10

Palestine

5

Russia

83

Rwanda

2

Serbia

1

Sierra Leone

10

Somalia

212

Sudan

76

Syria

2

Ukraine

115

Uzbekistan

7

Venezuela

3

Vietnam

4

Total

1.290

Note: Settlement numbers are for Richland only, not including Kennewick and Pasco of the Tri Cities

        Secondary Organizations:
The Family Learning Center
Kennewick, WA 99336
What They Do:

  • Offer English classes, and gives new arrivals a sense of community

  • Offer computer skills and homework assistance classes to enable parents to help their children in school.

Habitat for Humanity
Richland, WA 99352
Leadership:

  • Debbie Gracio, President

  • Jim Dirks, Vice President

  • Theresa Richardson, Executive Director

  • Terri LeBlanc, Secretary

What They Do:

  • Help with housing after refugees look to move from apartments set up by World Relief when they first arrive

Islamic Center of Tri-Cities
West Richland, WA 99353

Columbia Basin Community College ESL (English Second Language) Program
Pasco, WA 99301
What They Do:

  • Partner with World Relief through their English Second Language Program to offer English classes

Agape Literacy Center (Kennewick Baptist Church)
Kennewick, WA  99336
Leadership: Shirley Kanzler, Director
What They Do:

  • Offer English and citizenship classes

West Side Church
Address: 615 Wright Ave, Richland, WA 99352          

What They Do:

  • Partner with Habitat for Humanity to offer additional English classes

Kennewick First Christian Church
Kennewick, WA 99337    

What They Do:

  • Partner with Habitat for Humanity to offer additional English classes

Department of Children and Family Services (Office ID 722)
Richland, WA 99352

 Newspaper Articles:

“Tri Cities could see more refugees of Syria’s civil war”

Written by Sara Schilling
September 9, 2015
Describes some of the work that World Relief Tri-Cities does for refugees arriving in the area, as well as praises the community for welcoming and investing in new arrivals.
http://www.tri-cityherald.com/news/local/article34997601.html

“Family reunited when children from Myanmar arrive in Tri-Cities”
Written by Eric Francavilla
July 18, 2012
            Tells the story of a Burmese man and his wife separated from their children while fleeing their country before reuniting years later in Kennewick. The article describes the types of work they found to support themselves and their family, as well as ways in which the community has helped them along the way.    
http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2012/07/18/2023862/family-reunited-when-children.html

“Kennewick Family Learning Center reaches out to refugees”
Written by John Trumbo
December 5, 2010
            Describes the work the Family Learning Center does to assist refugees, as well as how they started. Relying heavily on volunteer work, they offer free English classes, as well as tutoring and computer skills classes.           
http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2010/12/05/1279525/kennewick-family-learning-center.html

“Habitat for Humanity Tri-Cities reaches 75 homes built”
Written by Kristi Pihl
February 25, 2012
            Tells the story of Burmese refugees receiving a home in Pasco thanks to the work of Habitat for Humanity. This article describes some of the work Habitat Humanity has done for refugees settling in the area, including average costs of homes (under $600 a month for mortgage, insurance, and taxes).
http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2012/02/25/1839953/habitat-for-humanity-tri-cities.html

Part 1: “Red tape keeps Somali mother, kids apart in Kennewick”, Part 2: “Somalian families torn apart by war unite in Tri-Cities”
Written by Michelle Dupler (Part 1), Jacques Von Lunen (Part 2)
May 8, 2011, July 15, 2011
Tells the story of two Somali refugees escaping war-torn Mogadishu, and waiting to reunite with their children after many years in Kennewick.
Part 1: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2011/05/08/1481806/red-tape-keeps-somali-mother-kids.html Part 2:http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2011/07/15/1567637/families-torn-apart-by-unrest.html

“Richland Iraqi refugee’s citizenship is stalled”
Written by Sara Schilling
September 12, 2015
Story of an Iraqi refugee and his family settled by Tri-City World Relief in Kennewick. His struggle to get US citizenship and a community raising over $20,000 for him to get a good prosthetic leg.
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/sep/12/richland-iraqi-refugees-citizenship-is-stalled/?page=all


Lincoln, NE

        Nebraska State Coordinators:
State Refugee Coordinator: Karen Parde
ORR State Analyst: Rezene Hagos

        Background Information:
Population in 2014: 273,996 (100% Urban, 0% rural)
Estimated per capita income in 2013: $25,745
Median House or Condo Value: $148,400
Median Gross Rent (2013): $722
Racial Breakdown:

  • White: 82%

  • Hispanic: 7.0%

  • Black alone: 4.4%

  • Asian alone: 4.2%

  • Two or more races: 1.9%

  • American Indian alone: 0.5%

Land Area: 74.6 square miles
Population Density: 3,657 people per square mile (average)
FBP: 5.9% (State Average: 4.4%
Unemployment Rate (September 2015): 2.1% (State Average: 2.6%)
Most Common Industries:

  • Sales and Related: 11%

  • Management: 10%

  • Construction and Extraction: 9%

  • Office and Administrative Support: 8%

  • Production: 8%

        Local Agencies Responsible for Settlement of Refugees (2):
Lutheran Family Services (Lincoln, NE 68510)
Refugee Resettlement Coordinator: Vanja Pejavonic
Employment Specialist: Katey Hulewicz
Refugee Support Program Coordinator: Patrice McShane-Jewell
Refugee Support Specialist: McKenzie Stauffer
About: Lutheran Family Services is a faith-based organization responsible for aiding refugees in the settlement process across Nebraska. In Lincoln, refugee services are broken into 3 departments: Refugee Education & Employment, Refugee Reception & Placement, and Refugee Support.
Some services include:

  • Job Counseling

  • Job Placement and Orientation

  • Case Management

  • ESL Classes

  • Provide support for psychologically traumatized refugees, as well as those with physical disabilities health issues

Catholic Social Services (Lincoln, NE 68510)
Refugee Resettlement Director: Carmen Lopez
About: Catholic Social Services works with the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the U.S. Department of State to resettle around 120 refugees per year.

Some services include assisting with:

  • Housing

  • Education

  • Employment

  • Cultural Orientation

Country of Origin

#Settled 2002-2015

Afghanistan

14

Belarus

1

Bhutan

6

Bosnia & Herzegovina

25

Burma

748

Burundi

9

Congo

12

Croatia

4

Cuba

23

Dem. Rep. of Congo

45

Eritrea

12

Estonia

3

Ethiopia

4

Iran

98

Iraq

711

Ivory Coast

6

Liberia

23

Mauritania

10

Noldova

3

Nepal

1

Nigeria

3

Palestine

7

Russia

46

Serbia

38

Sierra Leone

4

Somalia

532

Sudan

84

Thailand

3

Togo

13

Ukraine

137

Vietnam

156

Zimbabwe

2

Total

2,351

Secondary Organizations:

Center For People In Need
Lincoln, NE 68521
Leadership: Beatty Brasch, Founder (2003) & Executive Director
What They Do:

  • Refugee Resettlement Assistance

  • Help provide community resources, instruction on how to use medical services, help applying for housing assistance, green card assistance, citizenship and travel documents, employment authorization card

  • Interpretation services

  • Free services assisting eligible applicants through the entire naturalization process, including classes and mock interviews to help pass the U.S. naturalization exam

New American Task Force (NATF)
Lincoln, NE 68508
What They Do:

  • A network of 40 public and private organizations that work together to support New Americans in Lincoln

  • Collaborate to assist New Americans with overcoming the challenges of arriving in a new country, such as language barriers, finding employment, housing, and education

Asian Community and Cultural Center
Lincoln, NE 68510
Leadership:

Sheila Dorsey Vinton, Executive Director
Duy Linh Bui, Programs Coordinator

What They Do:

  • Offer free language classes, advanced writing classes, and citizenship classes

  • Organize cultural celebrations

Good Neighbor Community Center
Lincoln, NE 68503
Leadership: Zainab Al-Baaj, MENA Hope Coordinator
What They Do:

  • MENA Hope Project

  • Provides assistance to refugees and immigrants from the Middle East and North Africa

  • Collaborate with resettlement agencies to help them transition to their new homes

  • Families given priority to shop for clothes and food at the center, as well as enroll in classes

  • Friday Women Classes: cover many topics ranging from health, public safety, cooking, employment etc.

  • English Classes, GED classes, Computer Classes

  • MENACTIVITY: Program sponsored by the Community Health Endowment and KENO grant to help women and children get exercise at a local gym once a week. The program is in place especially for women whom cannot exercise in public due to their religious and cultural obligation to wear a hijab.

        Newspaper Articles:
“Lincoln Designated a Welcoming City for Immigrants”
Written by Jordan Pascale
June 21, 2013
Article on Welcoming America declaring Lincoln, NE one of the Top 10 most Welcoming Cities in America, and mentions some of the organizations in place that work to make the city “welcoming”, including NATF.
http://journalstar.com/news/local/lincoln-designated-welcoming-city-for-immigrants/article_5ca2fb0a-e802-560d-b764-46a6a6d473f5.html

“Arab Spring Refugees Bring Memories of War, Revolution to Nebraska”
Written by Ben Bohall
May 31st, 2012
Tells the story of two refugees in Lincoln from Tunisia and Libya, and the civil wars and revolutions that both of their home countries endured during the Arab Spring.
http://www.kvnonews.com/2012/05/arab-spring-refugees-bring-memories-of-war-revolution-to-nebraska/

“Lincoln High School Student Hopes to Help Refugees Connect”
Written by Veronica Ortega
April 4, 2016
Discusses the current state of the refugee crisis in Europe, and a high school student’s effort to bridge the gap between the two student groups of the International Baccalaureate program and English Language Learner program.
http://www.klkntv.com/story/31640728/lincoln-high-student-hopes-to-help-refugees-connect

 
“Lincoln Community Home to Refugees from Around the World”
Written by Erin Myers
December 5, 2011
Article discussing some of the major challenges refugees face when first arriving, mainly language, and what resources are in place in Lincoln to help refugees overcome these challenges.
http://www.newsnetnebraska.org/2011/12/05/lincoln-community-home-to-refugees-from-around-the-world/

“Lutheran Family Services Addressing Concerns for Resettling Syrian Refugees”
Written by Marjorie Sturgeon
November 18, 2015
Discusses the debate between Lutheran Family Services and Governor Ricketts on whether or not to settle Syrian refugees in Nebraska. The Governor is pleading to delay the resettlement of Syrians over security concerns.
http://www.kmtv.com/news/local-news/lutheran-family-services-addresses-concerns-for-resettling-syrian-refugees


Colchester, VT

Vermont State Coordinators:

State Refugee Coordinator: Denise Lamoureux

State Refugee Health Coordinator: Martha Friedman

ORR Regional Representative: Julie Munro

Background Information:

Population in 2010: 17,067
Estimated per capita income in 2013: $32,515
Median House or Condo Value in 2013: $263,466
Median Gross Rent (2013): $691
Racial Breakdown:

  • White: 93.5%

  • Asian alone: 2.1%

  • Hispanic: 1.6%

  • Black Alone: 1.2%

Land Area: 36.9 square miles
Population Density: 463 people per square mile (low)
FBP: 4.4% (State Average: 3.8%)
Unemployment Rate (September 2015): 3.1% (State Average: 3.9%)
Most Common Industries:

  • Computer and electronic products (14%)

  • Construction (10%)

  • Educational services (8%)

  • Accommodation and food services (6%)

  • Professional, scientific, and technical services (5%)

  • Public administration (4%)

  • Metal and metal products (3%)

        Local Agency Responsible for Settlement of Refugees:
Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program (USCIS)
Colchester, VT 05446,
Director: Amila Merdzanovic
About: VRRP is Vermont's local field office of the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, and has been operating for over 30 years. Services are provided with the help of various local community organizations.

 
Some Services Include:

  • Reception at the airport

  • Interpretation and translation

  • Cultural orientation

  • Housing assistance

  • Basic furnishings and housing wares

  • English language training

  • Employment counseling

  • Professional, culturally appropriate support

Country of Origin

#Settled 2002-2015

Afghanistan

10

Azerbaijan

30

Bhutan

360

Bosnia & Herzegovina

22

Burma

203

Burundi

114

Central African Republic

5

Congo

23

Dem. Rep. of Congo

113

Iraq

92

Liberia

81

Nepal

4

Russia

153

Rwanda

17

Serbia

38

Somalia

532

Sri Lanka

6

Sudan

84

Togo

15

Turkey

6

Total

1,834

        Secondary Organizations:
Associations-Africans Living in Vermont (AALV)
Burlington, VT
Leadership:
Executive Director: Yacouba Jacob Bogre
Program Specialist: Bhuwan Sharma
What They Do:

  • Interpretation and translation services

  • Health and behavior: This program focuses on domestic violence education and assistance and HIV prevention services for youth

  • Workforce development

  • Transition and integration: Connects immigrants and refugees with social service providers with the help of case managers

  • New Farms for New Americans (NFNA): This program provides subsistence size plots of land to all participants to increase food security among immigrants and refugees. NFNA oversees six acres of farmland, provides workshops on the specifics of farming in Vermont, and helps farmers to overcome the barriers that may prevent them from receiving farming and gardening technical skills.

Somali Bantu Association of Vermont
Winooski, VT
Leadership:
Office Manager: Mohamed Muktar
What They Do:

  • Adult literacy classes

  • New Fathers Initiative program: Support group for refugee fathers adjusting to life in Vermont

  • Knitting group project: Meant to create a environment where refugee women can socialize and form a bond over traditional crafts

  • Tabar Women’s Leadership Program

  • Youth Recreational Program

  • Reparative Probation Project

  • Community Support Program

  • Community Farming Project

  • Vital Information project

  • Citizenship classes

  • Interpretation services

Vermont Bhutanese Association
Winooski, VT
What They Do:

  • Foster intra and inter-community communications

  • Encourage cultural and religious identity, heritage and freedom

  • Advance personal, educational and occupational growth

Islamic Society of Vermont
Colchester, VT
Leadership:
Vice President (Acting President): Br. Farhad Khan


Rutland, VT

Vermont State Coordinators:

State Refugee Coordinator: Denise Lamoureux

State Refugee Health Coordinator: Martha Friedman

ORR Regional Representative: Julie Munro

Background Information:

Population in 2014: 15,942 (100% urban, 0% rural)
Estimated per capita income in 2013: $23,570
Median House or Condo Value in 2013: $159,899
Median Gross Rent (2013): $756
Racial Breakdown:

  • White: 95.6%

  • Two or more races: 1.6%

  • Asian alone: 1.2%

  • Hispanic: 0.9%

  • Black Alone: 0.6%

Land Area: 7.64 square miles
Population Density: 2,087 people per square mile (low)
FBP: 2.0% (State Average: 3.8%)
Unemployment Rate (September 2015): 5.3% (State Average: 3.9%)
Most Common Industries:

  • Manufacturing (22%)

  • Retail trade (13%)

  • Construction (11%)

  • Accommodation and food services (8%)

  • Educational services (8%)

  • Arts, entertainment, and recreation (5%)

  • Public administration (5%)

Local Agency Responsible for Settlement of Refugees:

Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program (USCIS)
Colchester, VT 05446,
Director: Amila Merdzanovic
About: VRRP is Vermont's local field office of the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, and has been operating for over 30 years. Services are provided with the help of various local community organizations.
Some Services Include:

  • Reception at the airport

  • Interpretation and translation

  • Cultural orientation

  • Housing assistance

  • Basic furnishings and housing wares

  • English language training

  • Employment counseling

  • Professional, culturally appropriate support

Settlement Breakdown 2002-2016:

Rutland has never before been an official resettlement site for refugees, but are currently awaiting the arrival 100 Syrian refugees in the coming fall of 2016, pending any overbearing public pushback.

Secondary Organizations:

Rutland Welcomes
About: Rutland Welcomes is a grassroots organization that is focused on organizing Rutland citizens into groups and committees in preparation for the arrival of 100 Syrian refugees in the fall. They are preparing and building the support and services to help these New Americans once they settle into their community. 20 Rutland Welcomes committees have already been formed.       

Newspaper Articles:

“Vermont Town Debates Syrian Refugee Resettlement Program”
Written by Nina Keck
July 1, 2016
Transcript of an NPR report on the debate in Rutland over accepting 100 Syrian refugees. Since the mayor announced that Rutland would accept this group of refugees, some members of the community have been pushing back against the decision believing that these refugees will be more of a burden and threat to the community.
http://www.npr.org/2016/07/01/484381701/vermont-town-debates-syrian-refugee-resettlement-program

“100 Syrian Refugees are Headed to Rutland”
Written by Nina Keck
April 26, 2016
This article discusses the pending resettlement of 100 Syrian refugees to Rutland, which will be the first site for Syrian refugees settling in the state. Included are quotes from the mayor of Rutland and the Director of VRRP, and also touches on the broader fears around the country surrounding the resettlement of Syrians.
http://digital.vpr.net/post/100-syrian-refugees-are-headed-rutland

“Critics of Rutland Refugee Plan Grill Aldermen, Resettlement Officials”
Written by Mark Davis
May 25, 2016
This article focuses on the backlash within the Rutland community to oppose the resettlement of 100 Syrians later this year. Critics of the plan claim they were blindsided, and that the trust between the citizens and the local government was broken in the process.
http://www.sevendaysvt.com/OffMessage/archives/2016/05/25/critics-of-rutland-refugee-plan-grill-aldermen-resettlement-officials

“Vermont city prepares for Syrian refugees with welcome, wariness”
Written by Brian MacQuarrie
May 13, 2016
This article features the Mayor of Rutland and the director VRRP defending the resettlement of Syrians to Rutland, and defending their decision to keep the process closed to the public. They argue that the community has resources to take in these refugees, and that any opposition is based on fear.
https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2016/05/12/vermont-city-prepares-for-syrian-refugees-with-welcome-
wariness/nfs6Z8QbcQZQzMmlqZm26I/story.html

“Rutland, Other Shrinking Small Towns, See Hope in Refugees”
Written by Tim Henderson
August 20, 2016
Discusses the arguments for and against the resettling of refugees in Rutland, and draws parallels between Rutland, VT and other small cities around the country that could be revitalized through the arrival of refugees.
http://www.vnews.com/Shrinking-small-towns-see-hope-in-refugees-4222723


Parallel Sites & Related Studies

Case Study: New Farms for New Americans (NFNA)

Religion and Refugees