How US Refugee Resettlement Works

US Refugee Resettlement Structural Diagram

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Overview


Federal Agencies

Profile: Department of Justice

  • Executive Office for Immigration Review

    Mission: The primary mission of the EOIR is to adjudicate immigration cases by fairly, expeditiously, and uniformly interpreting and administering the Nation’s immigration laws. Under delegated authority from the Attorney General, EOIR conducts immigration court proceedings, appellate reviews, and administrative hearing.

    Leadership:
    Juan P. Osuna, Director, Executive Office for Immigration Review

    Contact:
    Office of Communications and Legislative Affairs (P): 703-305-0289

    Office of Communications and Legislative Affairs: 
    5107 Leesburg Pike, Suite 1902
    Falls Church, VA 22041
    (P): 703-305-0289
    703-605-0365 (fax)

     

    Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices

    Mission: This office enforces the anti-discrimination provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) 8 U.S.C. § 1324b.

    Leadership:
    Alberto Ruisanchez, Deputy Special Counsel

    Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices:
    U.S. Department of Justice
    Civil Rights Division
    950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
    OSC, NYA 9000
    Washington, D.C. 20530

Profile: Department of Health and Human Services

  • Office for Civil Rights

    Mission: The mission of the Office for Civil Rights is to improve the health and well being of people across the nation; to ensure that people have equal access to and the opportunity to participate in and receive services from HHS programs without facing unlawful discrimination; and to protect the privacy and security of health information in accordance with applicable law.

    Leadership:
    Edwin Woo, Office of General Counsel
    Jocelyn Samuels, Director
    AJ Pearlman, Chief of Staff and Senior Advisor
    Robinsue Frohboese, Deputy Director for Civil Rights
    Christina Heide, Acting Deputy Director for Health Information Privacy
    Steve Novy, Deputy Director for Operations and Resources Division
    Kurt Temple, Centralized Case Management Operations

    Headquarters:
    c/o Centralized Case Management Operations
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Washington, D.C. 20201

     
    Regional Managers:
    Region I (Boston) – Susan Rhodes
    Region II (New York) – Linda Colón
    Region III (Philadelphia) – Barbara Holland
    Region IV (Atlanta) – Tim Noonan
    Region V (Chicago) – Art Garcia [Acting]
    Region VI (Dallas) – Vaniecy Nwigwe [Acting]
    Region VII (Kansas City) – Steven Mitchell [Acting]
    Region VIII (Denver) – Andrea Oliver
    Region IX (San Francisco) – Michael Leoz
    Region X (Seattle) – Linda Yuu Connor

    Regional Offices:

    Region 1 - Boston (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont)
    Susan Rhodes, Regional Manager
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Government Center
    J.F.Kennedy Federal Building - Room 1875
    Boston, MA 02203

    Region 2 - New York (New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands)
    Linda Colon, Regional Manager
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Jacob Javits Federal Building
    New York, NY 10278

    Region 3 - Philadelphia (Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia)
    Barbara Holland, Regional Manager
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Philadelphia, PA 19106-9111

    Region 4 - Atlanta (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North   Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee)
    Timothy Noonan, Regional Manager
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Atlanta, GA 30303-8909

    Region 5 - Chicago (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin)
    Art Garcia [Acting]
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Chicago, IL 60601

    Region 6 - Dallas (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas)
    Vaniecy Nwigwe [Acting]
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Dallas, TX 75202

    Region 7 - Kansas City (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska)
    Steven Mitchell [Acting]
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Kansas City, MO 64106

    Region 8 - Denver (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming)
    Andrea Oliver, Regional Manager
     HHS/Office for Civil Rights
    Denver, CO  80294

    Region 9 - San Francisco (American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada)
    Michael Leoz, Regional Manager
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    San Francisco, CA 94103

    Region 10 - Seattle (Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington)
    Linda Yuu Connor, Regional Manager
    Office for Civil Rights
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Seattle, WA 98104

    Center for Disease Control

    Mission: The CDC works 24/7 to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same.

    Leadership:
    Tom Friedman, CDC Director
    Ileana Arias, Principal Deputy Director

    Office:
    CDC Washington Office
    Washington DC 20201

    HSS Adminstration for Children and Families (ACF)

    Early Childhood Development

    Mission: The Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Interdepartmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development (ECD) promotes a joint approach at the federal level to improving the availability of high quality early learning and development programs. In addition to providing coordination across the Offices of Child Care and Head Start, we manage early childhood development efforts with other offices within the Department of Health and Human Services. We also work with other federal agencies, state and tribal councils and administrators, and a wide range of national organizations and non-profit partners.

    Leadership:
    Linda K. Smith, Deputy Assistant Secretary
    Shannon Rudisill, Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development
    Rachel Schumacher, Director, Office of Child Care
    Dr. Blanca Enriquez, Director, Office of Head Start

    Office:
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Washington, D.C. 20447

    HSS Affiliates

    Office of Equal Opportunity and Employment

    Mission: The Office of Equal Employment Opportunity (OEEO) fosters an inclusive culture, both nationally and internationally, through equity, opportunity, and respect. We believe that diversity in our workforce brings broad skills, experiences, and capabilities. Diversity in gender, race, ethnicity and other unique aspects are what make this agency richly and wonderfully empowered and capable to do the work of health protection and disease prevention for all people.

    Leadership:
    Reginald R. Mebane, Director
    Verdell Jordan, Deputy Director

    Office of Minority Health (CDC)

    Mission: Advance health equity and women’s health issues across the nation through CDC’s science and programs, and increase CDC’s capacity to leverage its diverse workforce and engage stakeholders toward this end.

    Leadership:
    Leandris C. Liburd, Associate Director

    Diversity & Inclusion Management Team (DM)
    James A. Nelson Sr., PhD, Chief Diversity Officer
    Fentress Truxon, MMPC, MA, Diversity Special Projects Advisor
    Andre Tyler, MSA, Diversity & Inclusion Consultant
    Kathy Robinson, MS, Diversity Program Specialist
    Yvonne Young, MPA, Management Analyst

    Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE):
    Centers for Disease Control
    & Prevention (CDC)
    Chamblee Campus
    Atlanta, GA 30341-3717 USA

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

    Mission: It is SAMHSA's mission to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities.

    Office of Communications
    Marla Hendricksson, Director
    Rockville, MD 20857

    Office of Financial Resources
    Deepa Avula, Deputy Director
    Rockville, MD 20857

    Office of the Administrator
    Pamela S. Hyde, Administrator
    Rockville, MD 20857

    Administration for Community Living

    Mission: From the beginning, ACL was based on a commitment to one fundamental principle—that people with disabilities and older adults should be able to live where they choose, with the people they choose and fully participate in their communities. Inherent in this principle is the core belief that everyone can contribute, throughout their lives.

    Leadership:
    Kathy Geenlee, Administrator, Administration for Community Living
    Sharon Lewis, Principal Deputy Administrator, Administration for Community Living
    Edwin Walker, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Aging
    Aaron Bishop, Commissioner, Administration on Disabilities
    John Wren, Deputy Administrator, Center for Integrated Programs
    Dan Berger, Deputy Administrator, Center for Management and Budget
    Vicki Gottlich, Director, Center for Policy and Evaluation
    Jamie Kendall, Acting Director, Independent Living
    Aviva Sufian, Director, Office of Regional Operations

    Contact:
    Office of the Administrator,
    Administration for Community Living
    Washington, DC 20001

    HHS Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Health and Wellness Resources

    Mission: It is the mission of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) to enhance and protect the health and well-being of all Americans. We fulfill that mission by providing for effective health and human services and fostering advances in medicine, public health, and social services.

    Leadership & Contacts:
    HHS Secretary
    Sylvia Mathews Burwell, scheduling@hhs.gov

    HHS Acting Deputy Secretary
    Mary K. Wakefield

    Assistant Secretary for Administration
    E.J. Holland

    Assistant Secretary for Financial Resources (ASFR)
    Ellen Murray

Profile: Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR)

  • Organization Overview

    Established: By Congress under The Refugee Act of 1980

    Affiliates & Partners (157#):

    Department of Health and Human Services (7):

    • Atlanta, GA (Center for Disease Control): http://www.cdc.gov/
    • Rockville, MD (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration): http://www.samhsa.gov/
    • Washington, DC (Office for Civil Rights): http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/office/index.html
    • Washington, DC (US Administration for Community Living): http://acl.gov/index.aspx
    • Washington, DC (HHS LGBT Health and Wellness Resources): http://www.hhs.gov/programs/topic-sites/lgbt/index.html
    • Washington, DC (ACF Early Childhood Development): http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd
    • Washington, DC (ACF Office of Community Services): http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ocs/help

     

    Department of Homeland Security (3):

    • Washington, DC (Customs and Border Patrol): http://www.cbp.gov/
    • Washington, DC (Immigration and Customs Enforcement): http://www.ice.gov/
    • Washington, DC (US Citizenship and Immigration Services): http://www.uscis.gov/

     

    Department of Justice (3):

    • Washington, DC (Bureau of Citizenship & Immigration Services, Executive Office of Immigration Review): http://www.justice.gov/eoir
    • Washington, DC (Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices): http://www.justice.gov/crt/about/osc/
    • Washington, DC (Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section): http://www.justice.gov/criminal-hrsp

     

    Department of State (1):
    Washington, DC (Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration): http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/resource/federal-agencies

    Mutual Assistance Associations (76):
    Local Organizations listed state by state at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/resource/mutual-assistance-associations

    State Partners (51):
    Each state (including DC) holds a State Refugee Coordinator, State Refugee Health Coordinator, and either an ORR Regional Representative or an ORR State Analyst. Complete list at:
    http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/resource/orr-funded-programs-key-contacts

    VOLAGS (9):

     

    Training and Technical Assistance Providers (7):

     

    Seven Departments:

    1.  Anti-Trafficking in Persons
    2.  Refugee Assistance
    3.  Refugee Health
    4.  Resettlement Services
    5.  Children’s Services
    6.  Policy
    7.  Office of the Director
      1.  Budget and Data Analysis
      2.  Repatriation

     

    Funding Source:
    The federal government funds the Office of Refugee Resettlement. In 2014, congress elected to raise ORR’s budget from $1.12 billion in 2013 to $1.489 billion.

    Mission:
    “Our office provides social services that help refugees become self-sufficient as quickly as possible after their arrival in the United States. To address specific health challenges of refugees, ORR also provides guidance, resources and oversight for medical assistance, initial medical screening and health and mental health consultation.”

    Leaders & Contacts:

    Director: Bob Carey

    Deputy Director: Ken Tota

    Deputy Director for Children’s Services: Bobbie Gregg

    Associate Deputy Director: Tricia Swartz

    Associate Director for Child Welfare: Dr. Elaine Kelley

    Director for Budget and Data Analysis (BDA): Joann Simmons

    Chief of Staff: Kate Wolff

    ORR Division of Policy

    Staff #: 9

    Responsibilities and Functions:

    • Drafting regulations, policies and other guidance materials for all ORR program areas
    • Identifying major emerging policy issues, developing policy options and strategies and implementing policy initiatives;
    • Writing clearance and informational memoranda, briefing materials and summary statements for ORR, ACF and department leadership on complex and sensitive ORR matters, and
    • Advising the ORR Director, deputies, division directors and regional staff on a wide range of significant and sensitive policy-related matters and strategies for attaining ORR policy objectives.

     

    Leadership: Anna Marie Bena, Director

    Link to 2013 Annual Report to Congress:

    http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/resource/office-of-refugee-resettlement-annual-report-to-congress-2013

    ORR Division of Anti-trafficking in Persons (ATIP)

    Mission: “ATIP is committed to helping victims of human trafficking receive the benefits and services they need to rebuild their lives in the United States, with the ultimate goal of turning victims of human trafficking into survivors of human trafficking.”

    Responsibilities and Functions:
    ATIP works to certify victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons in order to make them eligible for the same federal benefits and services as refugees. The ATIP is also committed to raising public awareness and educating the public in identification of these victims, especially in individuals likely to encounter victims such as social service providers, public health officials, and other public and community organizations.

    Programs & Grants

    Victim Identification and Public Awareness

    Rescue and Restore Campaign
    ATIP leads the HHS Rescue and Restore Victims of Human Trafficking public awareness campaign, which established Rescue and Restore coalitions in 24 cities, regions and States. These community action groups are comprised of NGO leaders, academics, students, law enforcement agents, and other key stakeholders who are committed to addressing the problem of human trafficking in their own communities.

    Rescue and Restore Regional Program
    The Rescue and Restore Regional Program serves as the focal point for regional public awareness campaign activities and intensification of local outreach to identify victims of human trafficking. Each Rescue and Restore Regional partner oversees and builds the capacity of a local anti-trafficking network, sub-awarding 60 percent of grant funds to grassroots organizations that identify and work with victims.

    Street Outreach Grants
    ATIP funds Street Outreach grants to support the identification of human trafficking victims among other vulnerable populations that the grantee organizations are already serving.

    Assistance for Victims of Human Trafficking

    Certifications and Eligibility Letters
    HHS is the sole Federal agency authorized to provide Eligibility Letters to minor foreign victims of human trafficking.

    Per Capita Services Contract
    Helps trafficking victims to become certified, and provides other short-term necessary services after Certification, through a network of nongovernmental service organization subcontractors in over 100 locations throughout the country

    Trafficking Victim Assistance Program
    The National Human Trafficking Victim Assistance Program [NHTRC] works to improve the national response to protect victims of human trafficking in the U.S. by providing callers with a range of comprehensive services, including crisis intervention, urgent and non-urgent referrals, tip reporting, and comprehensive anti-trafficking resources and technical assistance for the anti-trafficking field and those who wish to get involved.

    Affiliates and Locations:

    • USRI: HHS Regions 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10
    • Heartland Human Care Services: HHS Regions 1, 2 and 5
    • Tapestri, Inc: HHS Region 4

    Complete Chart of Grantees and their information:
    http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/resource/anti-trafficking-in-persons-grants

    Leadership: Maggie Wynne, Director

    Division of Anti-Trafficking in Persons
    Office of Refugee Resettlement
    Administration for Children and Families
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    901 D Street, SW
    Washington, DC 20447

    ORR Division of Refugee Services

    Responsibilities and Functions:
                 Division of Refugee Services directs and manages effective refugee resettlement through the programmatic implementation of grants, contracts and special initiatives, such as the Match Grant Program.  They also respond to unanticipated influxes of refugees or significant increases in arrival in communities that are not adequately prepared to provide the necessary services through supplemental initiatives.
                (Taken from the Federal Register at:
                 http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-11-10/pdf/2011-29075.pdf)

    Leadership: Anastasia Brown, Director

    ORR Division of Children’s Services (DCS)

    Established: March 1, 2003

    Responsibilities and Functions:
    The Homeland Security Act of 2002 transferred functions under U.S. immigration laws regarding the care and placement of unaccompanied alien children (UAC) from the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service to the Director of the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). Responsibilities include:

    • Making and implementing placement decisions for UAC
    • Ensuring that the interests of the UAC are considered in decisions related to their care and custody
    • Reunifying UAC with qualified sponsors and family members, when appropriate
    • Overseeing the infrastructure and personnel of ORR-funded UAC care provider facilities
    • Conducting on-site monitoring visits of ORR-funded care provider facilities and ensuring compliance with DUCS national care standards
    • Collecting, analyzing, and reporting statistical information on UAC
    • Providing training to federal, state, and local officials who have substantive contact with UACs
    • Developing procedures for age determinations and conducting these determinations along with DHS
    • Cooperating with the Department of Justice’s Executive Office for Immigration Review to ensure that sponsors of UACs receive legal orientation presentations
    • Ensuring, to the greatest extent practicable, that all UAC in custody have access to legal representation or counsel
    • Granting specific consent for state court jurisdiction over children

     

    Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM) Program:
    The URM program ensures that eligible unaccompanied minor populations receive the full range of assistance, care and services available to all foster children in the state by establishing a legal authority to act in place of the child’s unavailable parent(s). Our programs encourage reunification of children with their parents or other appropriate adult relatives through family tracing and coordination with local refugee resettlement agencies. However, if reunification is not possible, each program works to design a case specific permanency plan for each minor or youth in care.

    URM Program Sponsors:

    • United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB)
    • Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)

     

    Affiliates:

    • DHS
    • Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
    • Department of Justice (DOJ)
    • Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR)
    • Non –profit community based legal service providers

     

    Staff (#) & Leadership:

    Administration (10 Members):
    Tricia Swartz, Associate Deputy Director
    Jailyn Sualog, Director

    Program Support (10 Members)

    Field Specialists (54 Members):
    Richard Zapata, Federal Field Specialist
    Ivonne Velazquez, Federal Field Specialist Supervisor
    Alex Sanchez, Federal Field Specialist

    Project Officers (25 Members)

    Intakes (18 Members)

    Medical (3 Members)

    Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM) Program:
    Jearl Ward, URM Supervisor

     

    ORR Division of Refugee Health

    Established: November 10, 2011 through the Office of Refugee Resettlement’s reorganization

    Mission: “To promote health and emotional wellness by providing federal leadership, partnership and resources for culturally and linguistically appropriate services”

    Responsibilities and Functions:
    DRH also oversees the Refugee Medical Assistance and Refugee Medical Screening programs in collaboration with the Division of Refugee Assistance.  DRH engages federal, state and non-governmental partners to promote refugee health through six key strategies:  prevention and early intervention, health education, community-based health initiatives, language access, resource mapping and evidence-based activities.

    Programs

    Preventative Health
    States and state-alternative programs and their designated health agencies receive RPH funding that reduces the spread of infectious disease, treats current ailments, promotes preventative health practices for newly arriving refugees in accordance with the Revised Medical Screening Guidelines for Newly Arriving Refugees.

    Services to Survivors of Torture
    Provides grants for services that work to rehab individuals, physically and psychologically, whom were victims of torture prior to entering the US.

    Affiliates:

    • SAMHSA-HSRA Center for Integrated Health Solutions

    Staff & Leadership:
    Curi Kim, Director
    Tim Kelly, Program Specialist for Survivors of Torture

    ORR Division of Refugee Assistance (DRA)

    About:
    The Division of Refugee Assistance (DRA) was created to oversee and provide guidance to State-administered programs that provide assistance and services to refugees, asylees, certain Amerasian immigrants, Cuban and Haitian Entrants, and Victims of Human Trafficking.

    Mission: “DRA provides direction to States to ensure that refugees are provided assistance and services through State-administered programs that enable them to become employed and economically self-sufficient as soon as possible after their arrival in the United States.”

    Programs
    Cash and Medical Assistance Program
    The Cash and Medical Assistance (CMA) Program is part of the Division of Refugee Assistance. CMA reimburses states for 100 percent of services provided to refugees and other eligible persons, as well as associated administrative costs.

    Public/Private Partnership Program 
    PPP programs allow states to join a partnership with local voluntary settlement agency affiliates for the provision of refugee cash assistance. The goal of this program is to build a better quality resettlement system while maintaining State responsibility for policy and oversight. PPP programs are currently funded in the five states of Maryland, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Texas.

    Wilson/Fish Alternative Program
    The Wilson-Fish (WF) program is an alternative to traditional state administered refugee resettlement programs for providing assistance (cash and medical) and social services to refugees. This program also ensures that there are refugee assistance programs in all states where refugees are settled.

    Refugee Social Services Program 
    This program supports employability services and other services that address barriers to employment such as social adjustment, language barriers, childcare and citizenship and naturalization. The Refugee Social Services Program allocates formula funds to states to serve refugees who have been in the U.S. less than five years.

    Targeted Assistance Program (TAG)
    Similar to the Refugee Social Services program, but different in prioritizing long-term, cash assistance recipients, unemployed refugees not receiving cash assistance, and employed refugees in need of services to retain employment or to attain economic independence. TAG allocates formula funds to states that qualify due to an influx of refugee arrivals seeking public assistance.

    Cuban Haitian Program 
    The Cuban Haitian Program is part of the Division of Refugee Assistance and provides discretionary grants to state and state-alternative programs. These grants fund projects in localities most heavily impacted by Cuban and Haitian entrants and refugees. 

    Refugee Preventive Health/Refugee Health Promotion Program (RPH)
    States and state-alternative programs and their designated health agencies receive RPH funding that reduces the spread of infectious disease, treats current ailments, promotes preventative health practices for newly arriving refugees in accordance with the Revised Medical Screening Guidelines for Newly Arriving Refugees.

    Refugee School Impact Program
    Provides funding for activities that lead to the effective integration and education of refugee children. State and state-alternative programs receive grants to support impacted school districts services for school-age refugees.

    Services to Older Refugees Program
    The Services to Older Refugees Program ensures that refugees age 60 and above have access to mainstream aging services in their community.

    Targeted Assistance Discretionary Program
    Provides grants to address the employment needs of refugees that cannot be met with the Formula Social Services or Formula Targeted Assistance Grant Programs. Services mainly focus on refugees who continue to need services beyond the initial years of resettlement.

    DRA Head Quarters Staff:
    Carl Rubenstein, Director
    Goran Debelnogich, Sr. Principal Analyst
    Rezene Hagos, State Analyst

    DRA Regional Representation:
    Region 1 (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) and NY: Julie Munro
     
    Region 3 (DC, DE, MD, PA, VA, WV) and NJ: Pierrot Rugaba

    Region 4 (AL, GA, FL, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN): Faith Hurt & Yvette McDonald

    Region 5 (IN, IL, MI, MN, OH, WI): Chandra Allgood-Foster

    Region 6 (AR, LA, NM, OK, TX): Ramon Colon

    Region 7 (IA, KS, NE, MO):  Rezene Hagos

    Region 8 (CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY): Dee Daniels Scriven & AdrienneYoung

    Region 9 (AZ, CA, HI, NV): Patricia Pianko & Bowa Tucker

    Region 10 (AK, ID, OR, WA): Jordan Becker

    ORR Office of the Director

    Departments

    Budget and Data Analysis (BDA):
    The Budget and Data Analysis (BDA) section of the Office of the Director is charged with overseeing the Office of Refugee Resettlement’s (ORR) annual budget, including formulation and execution, as well as allocating and tracking funds for refugee cash and medical assistance and State administrative costs and all other ORR programs, tracking refugee population arrivals, allocating formula funds for Social Services and Targeted Assistance Programs, and providing general budgetary guidance and assistance to the Director.

    BDA works with the ACF Office of Legislative Affairs and Budget (OLAB), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Assistant Secretary for Resources and Technology (ASRT), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and Congress.

    BDA is responsible for the operation and maintenance of ORR Refugee Arrivals Data System (RADS), the central repository for data on refugee populations served by ORR (absent Trafficking and Unaccompanied Alien Children). BDA has taken many steps to improve the integrity and completeness of the RADS database by seeking out data from all possible sources, including the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, and the Department of State. Information from the RADS database is used in determining State formula funds allocations, Targeted Assistance formula allocating, as well as in responding to media, academic, and program inquiries about populations served by ORR grantees.

    BDA is also responsible for compiling the ORR Annual Report to Congress, conducting the Annual Survey of Refugees, approving cost allocations plans, requesting OMB forms clearance, responding to audits, and preparing the annual Federal Managers Financial Integrity Act report.

    Repatriation
    Through the U.S. Repatriation Program, ORR provides loans to eligible repatriates referred from the U.S. Department of State.

    Repatriation Programs and Activities:

    The Individual Repatriation Activity serves individuals or families in need of assistance upon arrival to the U.S. and is part of the regular/ongoing non-emergency caseload.

    The Mentally Ill Activity provides for the care and treatment of eligible legally insane or otherwise mentally ill persons and is part of the regular/ongoing non-emergency case load

    The Group Repatriation Activity allows for the evacuation of 50 to 500 U.S. citizens and dependents from overseas to the U.S. due to war, threat of war and other overseas crises (such as natural disasters).

    The Emergency Repatriation Activity allows for the evacuation of 500 or more U.S. citizens and dependents from overseas to the U.S. due to war, threat or war and other overseas crisis.

    Contacts:

    Director: Bob Carey

    Deputy Director: Ken Tota

    Deputy Director for Children’s Services: Bobbie Gregg

    Associate Deputy Director: Tricia Swartz

    Associate Director for Child Welfare: Dr. Elaine Kelley

    Director for Budget and Data Analysis (BDA): Joann Simmons

    Chief of Staff: Kate Wolff

Profile: Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

  • Customs and Border Control

    Mission: To safeguard America's borders thereby protecting the public from dangerous people and materials while enhancing the Nation's global economic competitiveness by enabling legitimate trade and travel.

    Leadership:
    Gil Kerlikowske, Commissioner
    Kevin K. McAleenan, Deputy Commissioner
     

    Additional Staff Contact Information:

    Privacy and Diversity, Executive Director
    Franklin Jones

    Chief Counsel
    Scott K. Falk

    Policy & Planning, Executive Director
    Benjamin E. Webb

    Trade Relations, Senior Advisor
    Maria Luisa Boyce

    Joint Operations Directorate, Executive Director
    Mark Dolan

    Strategic Integration, Principal Executive
    Walter "Andy" Brinton

    Program Development, Acting Principal Executive
    Andrew Goldsmith

    Executive Secretariat, Director
    Joseph Tezak

    Non-Government Organization Liaison
    Anna Hinken
     
    Office:
    Washington, DC 20229

     

    Immigration and Customs Enforcement

    Mission: ICE's primary mission is to promote homeland security and public safety through the criminal and civil enforcement of federal laws governing border control, customs, trade and immigration.

    This mission is executed through the enforcement of more than 400 federal statutes and focuses on smart immigration enforcement, preventing terrorism and combating the illegal movement of people and goods.

    Leadership:
    Sarah Saldaña, Director
    Daniel Ragsdale, Deputy Director
    Leonard Joseph, Chief of Staff
    Jason M. Yanussi, Assistant Director, Office of Congressional Relationships
     
    Office:
    U.S Immigration and Customs Enforcement
    Washington, D.C. 20536

Profile: United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)

  • Organization Overview

    Department of Homeland Security

    Established: March 1, 2003 under the Homeland Security Act of 2002, along with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

    Funding Source: Primarily funded through service fees.
    Field Offices: 230 Offices (Domestic & Foreign)
    Employees: 10, 878

    Departments

    Administrative Appeals Office (AAO)
    Conduct administrative review for appeals of petitioners and applicants whom were denied of certain categories of immigration benefits.

    Leadership:
    Ron Rosenberg, Chief, Administrative Appeals Office

    Contact: 1-703-224-4501

    Customer Service and Public Engagement Directorate (PED)
    Their mission is to provide clear, accurate, and timely response to customer concerns and questions, and engage the public through transparent dialogue that            promotes participation and feedback.             

    Leadership:
    Mariela Melero, Associate Director, Customer Service & Public Engagement     Directorate

    Field Operations Directorate
    Mission is to ensure the integrity of the immigration system and lend assistance to applicants, petitioners, and beneficiaries through the field offices and National Benefits Center. It includes 83 field offices that provide immigration services directly to applicants and petitioners, the National Benefits Center (NBC), which performs centralized front-end processing of applications and petitions that require field office interviews, and a headquarters office, four regional offices, and 26 district offices to oversee all other field offices and NBC.           

    Fraud Defection and National Security (FDNS)
    FDNS’s primary mission is to determine whether individuals or organizations filing for immigration benefits pose a threat to national security, public safety, or the integrity of the nation’s legal immigration system.
    It was established in 2004 in order to strengthen national security and ensure that immigration services are not granted to those who pose a threat to national security, or are attempting to defraud our immigration system.
    In July 2009, FDNS implemented the Administrative Site Visit and Verification Program (ASVVP) to conduct unannounced site inspections to verify information contained in certain visa petitions.

    Lockbox Intake
    Mission is to deliver effective, efficient and innovative customer-focused intake and secure document production services.
    They are comprised of over 130 federal employees nationwide. The USCIS Lockbox facilities located in Chicago, IL; Phoenix, AZ; and Lewisville, TX, are operated by a Department of Treasury designated financial agent.

    Leadership:
    Ernest DeStefano, Chief, Office of Intake and Document Production

    Office of Citizenship
    The Office of Citizenship seeks to engage and support partners to welcome immigrants, promote English language learning and education on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and encourage U.S. citizenship.

    The Office of Citizenship is divided into three divisions:

    1. Citizenship Education and Training
    2. Publications and Outreach
    3. Grants

    Leadership:
    Laura Patching is the Chief of the Office of Citizenship

    Office of Communications
    The Office of Communications (OCOMM) oversees and coordinates official USCIS communications to both internal and external audiences.

    6 Divisions:

    1. Strategic Communications
    2. Media Relations
    3. e-Communications
    4. Multimedia
    5. Plain Language and Content
    6. Employee Communications and Engagement

    Leadership:
    Angelica Alfonso-Royals, Chief, Office of Communications

    Office of Legislative Affairs (OLA)
    OLA supports USCIS by maintaining effective relationships with Congress through prompt responses to constituent concerns, proactive outreach on issues of interest and ongoing educational activities for members and staff. Divided into 3 Branches:

    1. The Legislative Branch
    2. The National Coordination Branch
    3. The Operations Branch

    Leadership:
    James McCament, Chief, USCIS Office of Legislative Affairs

    Contact: 202-272-1940

    Office of Privacy
    The Office of Privacy seeks to preserve and enhance privacy protections for    individuals and to promote transparency of USCIS operations.

    Leadership: Donald K. Hawkins, Chief Privacy Officer

    Office of Transformation Coordination
    The Office of Transformation Coordination manages and oversees the development of the USCIS Electronic Immigration System (USCIS ELIS) to move the agency from a           paper-based application and adjudication process to an electronic one.

    Four major operational divisions:

    1. Business Integration
    2. Stakeholder Readiness
    3. Program Management
    4. Release Management.

    Leadership:
    Kathleen Stanley, Chief, Office of Transformation Coordination

    Refugee, Asylum, and International Operations Directorate (RAIO)
    Provide immigration, protection and humanitarian services for people who are fleeing oppression, persecution or torture, facing urgent humanitarian situations, and best served in our international offices, such as military members who are serving overseas and permanent residents who need replacement documents to return to the U.S.

    3 Divisions:

    1. Refugee Affairs
    2. Asylum Division
    3. International Operations Division.

    Leadership:
    Joseph E. Langlois, Associate Director, Refugee & Asylum International Operations

    SAVE Program
    The SAVE Program provides timely customer-focused immigration status information to authorized agencies in order to assist them in maintaining the integrity of their programs.  SAVE will promote the use of automated systems to enhance efficiency, customer service and interagency collaboration, while protecting sensitive information.

    Service Center Operations Directorate (SCOPS)
    Service Center Operations Directorate provides services for persons seeking immigration benefits while ensuring the integrity and security of our immigration system.

    Leadership:
    Donald Neufeld, Associate Director, Service Center Operations Directorate
    Barbara Velarde, Deputy Associate Director, Service Center Operations Directorate

    The Citizenship and Integration Grant Program
    Total list of 2014 grantees (40) of the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program is available at the link below. Recipients range from colleges/universities, to religious organizations, and international and community organizations. 25% of the 40 grantees were affiliates of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc (CLINIC). The large majority of grants were for $250,00, while the smallest grant was over $197,000. The grant is for a two-year span. http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/About%20Us/Citizenship%20and%20Integration%20Grant%20Program/FY2014_Citizenship_Grant_Recipients.pdf

    USCIS Leadership:

    USCIS: Refugee, Asylum, and International Operations Directorate (RAIO)

    Field Offices:

    Headquarters

    • Anaheim, CA
    • Miami, FL
    • Washington, DC

     

    Other Offices

    • 2 domestic offices that adjudicate overseas applications not requiring interviews
    • 8 domestic asylum offices
    • 1 office in Miami that provides resettlement and orientation benefits to Cuban and Haitian parolees

     

    Leadership:
    Joseph E. Langlois, Associate Director, Refugee, Asylum & International Operations

    International Operations Division

    Field Offices:
    25 International Offices

    Asia/Pacific (APAC) District (#Total Staff)
    The APAC District Office, located in Bangkok, has one (1) District Director, one (1) Deputy District Director, one (1) Mission Support Specialist, and four (4) Locally Employed Staff. The APAC District Office has management oversight of IO offices in Bangkok, Beijing, Guangzhou, Manila, New Delhi, and Seoul.

    Bangkok (9)- Field Office Director, (5) Adjudications Officer, (3) Locally Employed Staff
    Beijing (8)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer,  (6) Locally Employed Staff
    Guangzhou (9)- Field Office Director, (3) Adjudications Officer, (5) Locally Employed Staff
    Manila (8)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (6) Locally Employed Staff
    New Delhi (11)- Field Office Director, (2) Adjudications Officer, (2) Immigration Officer           FDNS, (7) Locally Employed Staff
    Seoul (5)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (3) Locally Employed Staff  

    Latin America, Canada, and Caribbean (LACC) District (#Total Staff)
    The LACC District Office, located in Mexico City, has one (1) District Director, one (1) Deputy District Director, one (1) Mission Support Specialist, and three (3) Locally Employed Staff. The LACC District Office has management oversight of IO offices in Ciudad Juarez, Guatemala City, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Monterrey, Port-au-Prince, San Salvador, and Santo Domingo.

    CD Juarez (5)- Field Office Director, (4) Locally Employed Staff
    Guatemala (7)- Field Office Director, (2) Adjudications Officer, (4) Locally Employed Staff
    Havana (7)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (5) Locally Employed Staff
    Lima (5)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (3) Locally Employed Staff
    Mexico City (9)- Field Office Director, (2) Adjudications Officer, (6) Locally Employed Staff
    Monterrey (5)-Field Office Director, (1) Immigration Officer FDNS, (3) Locally Employed Staff
    Port-au-Prince (10)-Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (8) Locally Employed Staff
    San Salvador (5)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (3) Locally Employed Staff
    Santo Domingo (3)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (1) Locally Employed Staff
     

    Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) District (#Total Staff)
    The EMEA District Office, located in Rome, has one (1) District Director, one (1) Deputy District Director, one (1) Mission Support Specialist, and three (3) Locally Employed Staff. The EMEA District Office has management oversight of IO offices in Accra, Amman, Athens, Frankfurt, Johannesburg, London, Moscow, Nairobi, Rome, and Vienna.

    Accra (5)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (3) Locally Employed Staff
    Amman (3)- Field Office Director, (2) Locally Employed Staff
    Athens (6)- Field Office Director, (2) Adjudications Officer, (3) Locally Employed Staff
    Frankfurt (8)- Field Office Director, (2) Adjudications Officer, (1) Immigration Officer FDNS, (4) Locally Employed Staff
    Johannesburg (2)- Field Office Director, (1) Locally Employed Staff
    Rome (10)- Field Office Director, (2) Adjudications Officer, (4) Adjudications Specialist, (3) Locally Employed Staff
    London (3)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Specialist, (1) Locally Employed Staff
    Moscow (7)- Field Office Director, (3) Adjudications Officer, (3) Locally Employed Staff
    Nairobi (5)- Field Office Director, (1) Adjudications Officer, (4) Locally Employed Staff
    Vienna (3)- Field Office Director, (2) Locally Employed Staff

    Responsibilities and Functions:
    The International Operations Division is the section of the USCIS’s RAIO Directorate that is responsible for advancing the USCIS mission around the globe.

    The Chidren’s Affairs and Parole Policy Branch (CAPP), based in Washington, DC, is responsible for providing policy, operational, and case-specific guidance on inter-country adoption issues to IO field offices and serves as the primary USCIS liaison to the Department of State on adoption issues, and is also responsible for IO policy and guidance on DNA test result evidence and surrogacy matters within IO.

    The Humanitarian Affairs Branch (HAB), based in Washington, DC, adjudicates requests for parole used to bring otherwise inadmissible individuals to the U.S. on a temporary basis for urgent humanitarian reasons or reasons of significant public benefit. HAB also administers the Cuban and Haitian Entrant Program (CHEP), which is a grant program for NGOs working with the resettlement of Cuban and Haitian migrants.

    The International Adjudications Support Branch (IASB) provides adjudicative support to international offices by adjudicating overflow caseloads from international offices and HAB and by providing temporary coverage at international offices, as needed. . IASB is responsible for program management and adjudication of cases under the Cuban Medical Professional Parole (CMPP) program.

    The Production and Resource Management Branch (PRM) provides infrastructure support to IO headquarters and the field through budget development and management, performing workload and resource analyses to evaluate the degree to which IO is right sized and, as needed, coordinating the realignment or adjustment of resources to address 2 April 2015 workload needs. PRM also provides production and performance management, records maintenance, statistical analysis, and coordinates the deployment and return of staff to and from international locations.

    The Programs and Integrity Branch (PIB) develops policy and guidance on applications and petitions filed for non-citizen relatives of U.S. citizens and residents seeking to enter the United States, for refugee/asylee family members following-to-join, and for naturalization of U.S. military personnel and their qualified family members stationed overseas. PIB is also responsible for investigating and preventing any issues of fraud and exploitation of USCIS operations.

    The Quality Assurance, Training, and Communications Branch (QATC) develops and implements quality management and training programs for all IO staff, ensures that internal and external communication is current and accurate, and participates in meetings with government and non-government partners to promote the mission of the agency.

    The international responsibilities of the IO can be divided into three general areas of:

    1. Immigration Services
    2. Fraud Detection and Deterrence
    3. Inter and Intra-Government Liaison/Technical Support.
    Refugee Affairs Division

    Field Offices:

    Offices located all around the world, and are distributed as such: Region (#offices)

    • Latin America & Caribbean (5)
    • Africa (26)
    • Near East & South Asia (14)
    • East Asia (6)
    • Europe & Central Asia (15) 

     

    Responsibilities and Functions:

    • Conduct interviews overseas with refugee applicants identified for potential resettlement in the United States, and conduct protective screening for migrants interdicted at sea.
    • Work with governmental and nongovernmental organizations, including the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration at the Department of State, in order to support the annual settlement capacity determined by the President
    • Ensure the integrity of adjudications through liaison with anti-fraud, law enforcement, intelligence, and national security colleagues

     

    Divided into 5 branches:

    1. Training & Quality Assurance Branch
    2. Security Vetting Program Integrity Branch
    3. Policy and Regional Operations Branch
    4. Overseas Operations Branch
    5. Domestic Operations Branch.

     

    Leadership:
    Barbara L Strack, Division Chief, Refugee Affairs Division
    Anne Chiorazzi, Acting Deputy Chief, Refugee Affairs Division

    Asylum Division Overview

    Field Offices (8):

    • Arlington, VA
    • Chicago, IL
    • Houston, TX
    • Los Angeles, CA
    • Miami, FL
    • Newark, NJ
    • New York, NY
    • San Francisco, CA

     

    Responsibilities & Functions:

    • Management of affirmative asylum applications
    • Suspension of deportation or cancellation of removal under the Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act (NACARA 203)
    • Management of credible fear screenings for individuals in expedited removal.
    • Reasonable fear screenings for certain individuals subject to administrative removal
    • Asylum officers also travel overseas to conduct interviews and process refugee applications.

     

    Divided into 3 branches:

    1. Operations Branch
    2. Management Branch
    3. Training, Research, and Quality Branch

     

    Leadership:
    Ted Kim, Deputy Chief of Asylum Division
    Mary Margaret Stone, Chief of Operations Branch
    Deborah Mancuso, Management Branch Chief
    Charles “Locky” Nimick, Training, Research, and Quality Branch Chief

Profile: Department of State

  • Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

    Mission: Provide protection, ease suffering, and resolve the plight of persecuted and uprooted people around the world by providing life-sustaining assistance, working through multilateral systems to build global partnerships, promoting best practices in humanitarian response, and ensuring that humanitarian principles are thoroughly integrated into U.S. foreign and national security policy.

    Responsibilities and Functions: The Bureau does not directly operate refugee camps or give aid directly to refugees. Rather, they work with the United Nations and other international organizations and NGOs, and manage the contributions to these organizations and monitor the programs they fund. Organizations like UNHCR, International Medical Corps., International Rescue Committee, which work directly to aid refugees, receive funding from the Bureau.

    Staff: Approximately 130 civil service and Foreign Service staff

    Offices:

    • Internationally: Divided into geographic offices
    • Work with international community to develop “durable solutions” to refugee displacement. The three “durable solutions” are:
    1. Repatriation – going home when they are no longer at risk of persecution
    2. Local Integration – settling permanently in the country to which they have fled
    3. Resettlement – settling permanently in a third country
    • Admissions Office: Handles resettlement of refugees within the United States
    • Policy Office: Monitors and evaluates the work of organizations PRM funds

     

    Partners/Affiliates (5):

     

    Leadership:

    Lawrence Bartlett, Director, Office of Admissions
    Kelly Gauger, Deputy Director, Office of Admissions
    Ann C. Richard, Assistant Secretary
    Simon Henshaw, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary
    Kelly Tallman Clements, Deputy Assistant Secretary
    Catherine Wiesner, Deputy Assistant Secretary

    Contact:

    Lawrence Bartlett, Director, Office of Admissions
    Kelly Gauger, Deputy Director, Office of Admissions

    Reporters and editors should contact PRM-Press-DL@state.gov

    Those at non-governmental organizations interested in grants should contact the PRMNGO Coordinator at PRMNGOCoordinator@state.gov


State Resettlement Programs

Profile: State Programs

  • Alabama - Hawaii

    Alabama

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Catholic Social Services

                Refugee Resettlement Program

                Mobile, AL 36606

     

    ORR Funding FY12: $830,882

    Persons Settled (2012): 204

    Services Include:

    • Reception

    • Case management

    • Employment services

    • School enrollment

    • Medical case management

    • English as a Second Language (ESL)

    • Cultural and community orientation

    Contacts:

                Program Manager/ State Refugee Coordinator: Mary Katherine Sullivan

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Catherine Potter

                ORR Regional Representative: Faith Hurt

    Additional Organizational Info at:

    http://www.immigrationadvocates.org/nonprofit/legaldirectory/organization.392   535-Catholic_Social_Services_of_Mobile_Refugee_Resettlement_Program_Mobile_Off

     

    Alaska

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Catholic Social Services

                Refugee Assistance and Immigration Services [RAIS]

                Anchorage, AK 99508

     

    About:

    “Catholic Social Services’ Refugee Assistance & Immigration Services (RAIS) is the only state and federally funded resettlement program in Alaska. RAIS serves the refugee community statewide. Eligible clients include refugees, asylees, Cuban/Haitian entrants, as well as victims of trafficking generally in their first five years in the U.S. Additional programming serves the greater immigrant community.”

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $1,275,023

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 117

     

    Services Include:

    • Reception & Placement (for newly arrived refugees)

    • Case Management

    • Education & Employment Services

    • Health Promotion

    • Youth Programming

    • Green Cards

    • Naturalization

    • Refugee Family Reunification 

    Contacts:

                RAIS Program Director/ State Refugee Coordinator: Jessica Kovarik

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Guinora Kiyamova

                ORR Regional Representative: Jordan Becker

    Additional Info:

                RAIS Brochure: http://www.cssalaska.org/files/RAIS/RAIS_small.pdf

     

    Arizona

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Department of Economic Security

                Division of Aging and Adult Services

                Phoenix, AZ 85050

     

    About:

    “The Arizona Refugee Resettlement Program (RRP), the State’s refugee program, administers transitional benefits and services to assist refugees’ adjustment to life in the U.S. RRP is 100 percent funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Refugee Resettlement.”

                “Locally based private refugee resettlement agencies (RAs), welcome refugees upon their arrival to the United States and provide them essential services during their first 30 days in the U.S. These services are provided under cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM), and link to RRP’s federally funded transitional benefits and services.”

    ORR Funding FY2012: $19,143,197

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,723

    Services Include:

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS/LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of the Southwest (Phoenix)

    • ECDC, Arizona Immigrant and Refugee Services (Phoenix)

    • EMM/LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of the Southwest (Tucson)

    • IRC, Arizona Refugee Resettlement Program (Phoenix, Tucson)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Phoenix, Tucson) 

    Full List of Contractors (Resettlement agencies and service providers):

                https://des.az.gov/sites/default/files/AZ_RRP_Contractors.pdf

     

    Arkansas

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Catholic Charities of Arkansas

                Immigration Services, Refugee Resettlement Office

                Springdale, AR 72762

    ORR Funding FY2012: $95,000

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 37

     

    Services Include:

    • Reception

    • Case management

    • Employment services

    • School enrollment

    • Medical case management

    • English as a Second Language (ESL)

    • Cultural and community orientation

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Dave Mill

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Leonard Ntaate Mukasa

                ORR Regional Representative: Ramon Colon

    More info at: http://www.rcusa.org/uploads/pdfs/WRD-2014/Arkansas.pdf

     

    California

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                California Department of Social Services

                Refugee Program Bureau (RPB), California Refugee Resettlement Program-

                Sacramento, CA 94244

                http://www.dss.cahwnet.gov/refugeeprogram/

                Catholic Charities

                Refugee Services

                San Diego CA 92120

     

    About:

    “The RPB supervises county operations and delivery of RRP benefits and services. “ The California Department of Social Services manages statewide refugee assistance, while Catholic Charities manages refugee assistance in San Diego.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $50, 771, 598

    Persons Settled (2012): 14,511

    Services Include:

    • Cash and Medical Assistance

    • Employment Services

    • Unaccompanied Refugee Minor (URM) Program

    • Repatriation Program

    • Older Refugees Discretionary Grant

    • Refugee School Impact Program

    • Trafficking and Crime Victims Assistance Program

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • WRRS, World Relief Refugee Services (Carmichael, Garden Grove, Glendale, Modesto)

    • USCC, United States Catholic Conference (Fresno, Glendale, Los Angeles, Oakland, San Bernadino, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, Santa Ana, Santa Rosa, Stockton)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Glendale, Oakland, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose)

    • Immigration and Refugee Services of America (Glendale, Los Angele)

    • HIAS, Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (Los Angeles, Los Gatos, San Diego, San Francisco, Walnut Creek)

    • ECDC, Ethiopian Community Development Council (Anaheim, Los Angeles, San Diego)

    • CWS/EMM/LIRS Affiliates (Los Angeles)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Sysvanh Kabkeo

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Marisa Ramos

                ORR Regional Representative: Bowa Tucker

     

    Full contact list for California VOLAGs/Resettlement Agencies, October 2014:

    http://www.dss.cahwnet.gov/refugeeprogram/res/pdf/Lists/RAs_Listing.pdf

     

    Colorado

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Colorado Department of Health Services, Office of Economic Security

                Colorado Refugee Services Program

                Denver, CO 80203

                https://sites.google.com/a/state.co.us/cdhs-refugee/

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $15,333,291

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 1,681

     

    Services Include:

    • Housing assistance

    • Case management, career counseling & job development

    • Family Stabilization Specialists

    • Cultural Orientation

    • ESL classes

    • Medical and mental health services

    • Legal services, family reunification, and citizenship assistance

                Full State Refugee Service Plan at: https://sites.google.com/a/state.co.us/cdhs-             refugee/home/partners/direct-service-agencies

     

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • LIRS, Lutheran Family Services (Colorado Springs, Denver, Greeley)

    • EMM/CWS, Ecumenical Refugee Services (Denver)

    • ECDC, The African Community Center (Denver)

                Full Partner Overview at: https://sites.google.com/a/state.co.us/cdhs-                                                 refugee/home/partners/the-village

     

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Kit Taintor

     

                Grant & Programs Manager: Noyes Combs

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Carol Tumaylle

     

                Refugee Services Coordinator: Susan Anderson

                Program Monitor & Data Analyst: Tirshana Regmi

     

                Budget & Contracts Manager: Irene Law

     

                Training & Employment Coordinator: Nick Lesley

     

                Integration Partnerships Coordinator: Joe Wismann-Horther

     

    Connecticut

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS)

                Refugee Assistant Program

                Hartford, CT 06105   

                http://ct.gov/dss/cwp/view.asp?a=2353&q=413292

     

    About:

    “ DSS is responsible for disbursing federal funds related to the resettlement of refugees in Connecticut.  Refugees are assigned by the U.S. State Department to local affiliates of national voluntary resettlement agencies in Connecticut. DSS disburses federal refugee assistance program funds, administers refugee cash and medical assistance programs and monitors resettlement activity for individuals who qualify as refugees under international law.”

    ORR Funding FY2012: $2,492,573

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 607

     

    Services Include:

    • ESL classes

    • Job training, employment and vocational assistance

    • Housing, clothing, and food assistance

    • Educational assistance

    • Counseling and Case Management

    • Citizenship assistance

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities Migration and Refugee Services (Hartford)

    • USCRI, International Institute of CT, Inc. (Derby)

    • CWS/EMM, Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (New Haven)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Charles Anderson

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Alison Stratton

     

                ORR Regional Representative: Julie Munro

     

    Delaware

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Jewish Family Services of Delaware

                Wilmington, DE 19803

    ORR Funding FY2012: $200,000

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 36

     

    Services Include:

    • Food Security

    • Clothing Assistance

    • Housing Assistance

    • Health Care Assistance

    • English Language Instruction

    • Employment Services

    • Cultural Orientation

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Wilmington, Dover, Georgetown, Princess Anne)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Janneen E. Boyce

                ORR Regional Representative: Peirrot Rugaba

     

    Washington, DC

    (State Administered)

    District Refugee Resettlement Office:

                DC Department of Human Services

                ORR, Refugee Assistance

                Washington, DC 20002

     

    About:

    “Eligible refugees are referred by a third party to the Catholic Charities Refugee Center (CRCS) and Lutheran Social Services for services. After eligibility is determined by CRCS and the case is approved by the DC-Office of Refugee Resettlement, CRSC will refer the case for Refugee Health Screening and for Refugee Cash and Medical Assistance with Work Authorization.  CRSC will maintain the case for Employment and Case Management Services.”

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 12

    Services Include:

    • Employment Services

    • Services to victims of human trafficking

    • Refugee cash and medical assistance

    • Repatriation Services

    • Oversees Refugee Unaccompanied Minors Program 

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities Refugee Center (Washington DC)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Social Services (Washington DC)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Debra Crawford

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: MuLunesh Wolermarian

     

                ORR Regional Representative: Pierrot Rugaba

     

    Florida

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Florida Department of Children and Families

                Refugee Services

                Fort Pierce, FL 34950

     

    About:

    The Program manages over 40 community provider contracts and funds cash and medical assistance for eight months from the refugee's date of arrival to the U.S, totaling more than $80 million in federal aid to eligible clients.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $128,162,976

    Persons Settled (2012): 20,254

    Service Include:

    • Adult Education

    • Child Care

    • ECBO Services

    • Employability Related Immigration Services

    • Employment

    • Health Services

    • Interpreter Services

    • Integration Assistance

    • Unaccompanied Refugee Minor Program

    • Youth Services

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS, Church World Service (Doral, Delray Beach)

    • ECDC, Coptic Orthodox Charities Inc. (Clearwater)

    • EMM, (Miami, Jacksonville)

    • HIAS, Gulf Coast Jewish Family and Community Services (Clearwater, Broward County)

    • HIAS, Jewish Family Service of Broward County (Plantation)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Miami)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Services Florida (Miami, Orlando, Tampa)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of Northeast Florida (Jacksonville)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Miami, Orlando, North Port, Riviera Beach, Jacksonville, Naples, Pensacola, Tallahassee)

    • USCRI, Youth Co-Op Inc. (Miami, Palm Springs)

    • WR, World Relief (Jacksonville, Miami) 

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Patti Grogan

        State Refugee Health Coordinator: Sue Higgins

                ORR Regional Representative: Faith Hurt

    Refugee Services Program Administration (Full Contact List): http://www.dcf.state.fl.us/programs/refugee/docs/RSContactInfo.pdf

     

    Georgia

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Georgia Dept. of Human Services, Division of Family and Children Services

                Office of Family Independence, Refugee Program

                Atlanta, GA 30303

                https://dfcs.dhs.georgia.gov/refugee-resettlement

    About:

    “The Refugee Program Unit has responsibility for funding the delivery of services and to perform the functions of the State Refugee Coordinator… Social services are provided through 12 public and private agencies contracted by the State.”

                “The Division of Family and Children Services Refugee Program provides funds to the Division of Public Health through a Memorandum of Agreement to provide health screening and follow-up treatment to refugees.”

    ORR Funding FY2012: $13, 727,627

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,830

    Services Include:

    • English Language Instruction

    • Employment Services

    • Health Screening

    • Social Services

    • Medical and Cash Assistance

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Atlanta)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Atlanta)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Services of Georgia (Atlanta, Savannah)

    • WR, World Relief Atlanta, (Stone Mountain)

    • CWS/EMM, Refugee Resettlement and Immigration Services of Atlanta (Decatur)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Michael Singleton

               

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Monica L. Vargas

     

                ORR Regional Representative: Faith Hurt

    Hawaii

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:         

                Department of Labor and Industrial Relations

                Office of Community Services (OCS), Refugee Social Services

                Honolulu, HI 96813

    About:

    “OCS contracts annually with an organization to provide services under the Refugee Social Services Program. OCS operates the Cash and Medical Assistance (CMA) program under a memorandum of agreement with the Hawaii State Department of Human Services (DHS). DHS determines eligibility of individual refugees and trafficking victims for benefits and financial assistance.

    ORR Funding FY2012: $156,000

    Persons Settled (2012): 58

    Services Include:

    • Cash and Medical Assistance

    • Employment support services

    • Interpretation and translation language services

    • English language classes

    • Case management

    • Counseling

    • Basic computer skills

    • Job preparation, training, and placement

    • Technical assistance and micro-lending

    • Affordable housing

    • Legal services

    • Citizenship assistance and classes

    • Medical screenings and primary care

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCRI, Pacific Gateway Center (Honolulu)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Rona M. Suzuki

               

                ORR Regional: Bowa Tucker

    Idaho - Minnesota

    Idaho

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

    Idaho Office for Refugees
    Boise, Idaho 83702

    About:

    “The IOR has statewide responsibility for assistance and services to refugees. The IOR is a private sector initiative, replacing the traditional state-administered program for refugee assistance and services. Under agreement with the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement, the IOR eases the difficult transition refugees experience as they adjust to life in the US.”

    ORR Funding FY2012: $5,965,885

    Persons Settled (2012): 847

    Services Include:

    • The provision of interim financial assistance

    • English language training

    • Employment services

    • Immigration assistance

    • Language assistance

    • Case management and social adjustment services

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • EMM, Agency for New Americans (Boise)

    • WR, World Relief Treasure Valley (Boise)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Boise)

    • USCRI, College of Southern Idaho Refugee Service (Twin Falls)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator/Director, Idaho Office for Refugees: Jan Reeves

                Assistant Director, Idaho Office for Refugees: Patty Haller

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Collin Elias

               

                ORR Regional Representative: Jordan Becker

     

    Illinois

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Illinois Department of Human Services (Main Office)

                Bureau of Refugee and Immigrant Services, Family and  Community Services

                Chicago, IL 60607

    About:

    The Refugee Program procures community-based services to assist refugees, with a total of 9 program sites (6 in Chicago & 3 outside Chicago City Limits)

    ORR Funding FY2012: $12,353,859

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,921

     

    Services Include:

    • Adjustment counseling

    • Orientation

    • ESL classes

    • Vocational training

    • Job readiness and job placement

    • Health screenings

    • Multi-lingual mental health services

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • ECDC, Ethiopian Community Association of Chicago (Chicago)

    • CWS/EMM, Refugee One (Chicago)

    • HIAS, Jewish Child and Family Services (Chicago)

    • LIRS, Interfaith Refugee and Immigration Ministries (Chicago)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Chicago)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities Immigration and Refugee Services (Rockford)

    • USCRI, Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights (Chicago)

    • WR, World Relief (Chicago, DuPage/Aurora, Moline)

    Health and Medical Services for Newly Arrived Refugees:

    • Illinois Department of Public Health, (Chicago)

    • Mount Sinai/ Touhy Health Center (Chicago)

    • Access Community Health Network (Chicago)

    • Heartland Health Outreach (Chicago)

    • Chicago Department of Public Health (Chicago)

    • Rock Island County Health Dept. (Rock Island)

    • Winnebago County Health Dept. (Rockford)

    • Aunt Martha’s Health Center (Aurora)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Ngoan Le

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Jenny M. Aguirre

                ORR Regional Representative: Chandra Allgood Foster

     

     Indiana

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Indiana Refugee Services

                Family and Social Services Administration

                Indianapolis, IN 46219

     

    About:

    “Indiana Refugee Services monitors program planning, provision of services, and provides technical assistance to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations governing the delivery of refugee assistance and services, including cash and medical assistance.”

                It also serves as the liaison with the US Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration, and the US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Refugee Resettlement.

    ORR Funding FY2012: $5,106,050

    Persons Settled (2012): 1,361

    Services Include:

    • Cash and Medical Assistance

    • Employment support services

    • Interpretation and translation language services

    • English language classes

    • Case management

    • Counseling

    • Basic computer skills

    • Job preparation, training, and placement

    • Technical assistance and micro-lending

    • Affordable housing

    • Legal services

    • Citizenship assistance and classes

    • Medical screenings and primary care

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS, American Red Cross, Refugee Program (St. Joseph County, South Bend)

    • CWS/EMM, Exodus Refugee/Immigration, Inc. (Indianapolis)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Gary)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities of Fort Wayne-South Bend, Inc. (Fort Wayne)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities Indianapolis (Indianapolis)

    • World Relief (Fort Wayne)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Matthew Schomburg

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Ibrahim Dandakoye

                ORR Regional Representative: Chandra Allgood Foster

     

     

    Iowa

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Iowa Department of Human Services

                Iowa Bureau of Refugees

                Des Moines, IA 50314

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $2,579,149

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 479

    Services Include:

    • Language and interpretation services

    • Case management

    • Employment assistance and services

    • ESL classes

    • Skills training

    • Transportation assistance

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities, Des Moines (Cedar Rapids)

    • USCRI, United States Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (Des Moines)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Chad Dahm

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Jessica Eagan

                ORR Regional Representative: Rezene Hagos

     

      

    Kansas

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Kansas Department of Children and Families

                Economic and Employment Services Division, Kansas Refugee Program

                Topeka, Kansas 66603

    Note: They have 40 regional offices and service centers around the state

     

    About:

    “The Kansas Refugee Program supervises the administration of the Refugee Resettlement Program (RRP) and the Refugee Social Service Program (RSS). This public-private partnership provides a network of service providers committed to providing support services for this vulnerable population. Each provider is funded to provide services in a designated geographic area of the State. These organizations may be non-profit agencies, faith-based organizations or refugee managed community-based organizations.

    ORR Funding FY2012: $1,718,357

    Persons Settled (2012): 426

    Services Include:

    • Cash Assistance

    • Child Care and Early Education services

    • Energy cost assistance

    • Food assistance

    • Medical Assistance and health screenings

    • Employment services

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Agency for Migration & Refugee Services (Garden City)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities Inc. (Northeastern Kansas)

    • USCRI, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Wichita)

    • EMM Episcopal Migration Ministries (Central Kansas)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Lewis A. Kimsey

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Kendra Baldrige

                ORR Regional Representative: Rezene Hagos

    Kentucky

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Catholic Charities of Louisville (CCLou)

                Kentucky Office of Refugees (KOR)

                Louisville, KY 40212

                http://cclou.org/kor/

    About:

    “The Kentucky Office for Refugees was established in June of 2006 as a department of Catholic Charities of Louisville, Inc and is considered a Wilson-Fish program. The Director of the Kentucky Office for Refugees serves as the State Refugee Coordinator for Kentucky – a designation provided by the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). It provides leadership, policy guidance and advocacy on refugee resettlement issues, and annually administrates and awards $6 million in federal funds from the ORR.”

                Within CCLou, there is a department of Migration & Refugee Services (MRS), and a Refugee Agriculture Partnership Program (RAPP), as well as Targeted Assistance Grant Programs and Matching Grant Programs.

    ORR Funding FY2012: $12,748,690

    Persons Settled (2012): 1,976

    Services Include:

    • Case Management

    • Supportive Services

    • English Language Training

    • Employment Services

    • Housing and food assistance upon arrival

    • Cultural orientation

    • Long-term assistance with citizenship and job upgrades

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS/EMM, Kentucky Refugee Ministries, Inc. (Lexington, Louisville)

    • USCRI, The International Center (Bowling Green, Owensboro)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Becky Jordan

     

                Assistant Director, KOR: Maria Koerner

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Allison Pauly

                ORR Regional Representative: Faith Hurt

     

     

    Louisiana

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

               

                Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Baton Rouge

                Refugee & Immigration Services

                Baton Rouge, LA 70808

                Note: Also have offices located in Lafayette and Metairie

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $1,438,627

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 302

     

    Services Include:

    • Language training

    • Social and medical services

    • Counseling

    • Job placement

    • Family reunification

    • Citizenship preparation

    • Legal services

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Migration & Refugee Services (Baton Rouge, Lafayette)

    • USCCB, Resettlement Center of Central LA Inc. (Alexandria, Metairie)           

    Contacts:

                Refugee Resettlement Director: Lisa Lee

               

                State Refugee Coordinator: Corina E. Salazar

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Allison Pauly

                ORR Regional Representative: Faith Hurt

     

               

     

    Maine

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Catholic Charities Refugee and Immigration Services

                Portland, ME 04101    

    About:

    “RIS is Maine’s only active resettlement program, with contracts from the U.S. Departments of State and Health and Human Services, the Maine Department of Health and Human Services.”

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: 2,291,884

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 299

     

    Services Include:

    • Case Management

    • Corporate Training

    • Elder Services

    • Employment Services

    • Interpretation and Translation Services

    • Mentoring Programs

    • Affidavit of Relationship (AOR)

    • Legal Services

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Catherine S. Yomoah


    Refugee Health Coordinator: 
    Justin Nizeyumukiza


    ORR Regional Representative: 
    Julie Munro

     

    Additional Organizational Info at:

                http://www.ccmaine.org/refugee-immigration-services

     

     

     

    Maryland

    (Public Private Partnership)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

        Department of Human Resources, Maryland’s Human Service Agency

        Office for Refugees and Asylees (MORA)

        Baltimore, MD 21201

    About:

    MORA has helped more than 40,000 working through a network of public and private service providers to plan, administer, and coordinate transitional services.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $17,4446,602

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,381

    Services Include:

    • Job Readiness Training

    • Resume Writing

    • Job Search Assistance

    • Vocational Training

    • Interview Preparation

    • Transportation Assistance

    • Interpretation during job interviews

    • Post-placement mentoring for vocational success 

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • HIAS, Jewish Community Services (Baltimore)

    • HIAS, Jewish Social Services Agency (Rockville)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Baltimore, Silver Spring)

    • WR, World Relief Anne Arundel (Glen Burnie)

    • ECDC, African Community Center (Silver Spring)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of National Capitol Area (Silver Spring) 

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Augustin Ntabaganyimana

     

    State Refugee Health Coordinator: Dipti D. Shah


    ORR Regional Representative: 
    Pierrot Rugaba

     

    Additional Information at:

    http://dhr.maryland.gov/blog/maryland-office-for-refugees-and-asylees/

    Massachusetts

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

            

       Health and Human Services

               Office for Refugees and Immigrants
    Boston, MA 02111

     

    About:

    The Office administers programs that provide direct services to clients through a network of voluntary resettlement agencies, faith-based organizations and ethnic community-based organizations, which have the capacity to serve the culturally and linguistically diverse needs of newcomer populations

    ORR Funding FY2012: $19,826,396

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,108

     

    Services Include:

    • Community education and orientation

    • Cultural orientation to mainstream services

    • Outreach/screening/referral services

    • Translation and Interpreting

    • Youth Adjustment Services

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • HIAS, Jewish Family Service of Metrowest (Framingham)

    • HIAS, Jewish Family Service of Western Massachusetts (Springfield)

    • ECDC, Refugee & Immigrant Assistance Center (Jamaica Plain)

    • USCRI, International Institute (Boston, Lowell)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities, (Boston, Worcester)

    • Refugee and Immigrant Assistance Center (Worcester)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Boston)

    • EMM, Refugee Immigration Ministry (Malden)

    • CWS/EMM/LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of New England (Wellesley, Worcester, West Springfield, Newton Center)

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Mary Truong 

    State Refugee Health Coordinator: Jennifer Cochran

    ORR Regional Representative: Julie Munro

     

    Additional Information at:

    http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/ori/

     

      

     

    Michigan

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

        Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

        Office of Refugee Assistance

        Capitol View Building

        Lansing, Michigan 48913

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $17,077,100

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 4,100

     

    Services Include:

    • Employment Services

    • Education – School Impact Services

    • Preventive Health Services

    • Services to Older Refugees Program

    • Health Screening

    • Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (foster care services, etc.)

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • HIAS, Jewish Family Service of Washtenaw Country (Ann Arbor, West Bloomfield)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities of South East Michigan (Clinton Township)

    • USCCB, St. Vincent Catholic Charities Refugee Services (Lansing, Grand Rapids)

    • USCRI, US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (Dearborn, Detroit)

    • CWS, Bethany Christian Services (Grand Rapids)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Social Services (Detroit, Battle Creek, Grand Rapids, Lansing, Troy)

    • LIRS/EMM, Lutheran Social Services (Southfield)

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Al Horn

     

    State Refugee Health Coordinator: Al Horn

    ORR Regional Representative: Chandra Allgood Foster

     

    Additional Information at:

    http://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs/0,5885,7-339-71547_5526-15492--,00.html

     

     

     

    Minnesota

    (Public Private Partnership)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

        Minnesota Department of Human Services

        Resettlement Programs Office

        St. Paul, MN 55155

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $9,573,906

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 1,909

    Services Include:

    • Basic needs support

    • Home visits

    • Case management

    • Community orientation

    • Referrals to health services

    • Employment services

    • Education and training

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of Minnesota (Minneapolis, Saint Cloud)

    • EMM, Episcopal Migration Ministries (Minneapolis)

    • CWS, Minnesota Council of Churches (Minneapolis)

    • WR, World Relief Arrive Ministries (Richfield)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Saint Paul, Rochester)

    • USCRI, International Institute of Minnesota (St. Paul)

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Rachele King

    State Refugee Health Coordinator (Acting): Blain Mamo

    ORR Regional Representative: Chandra Allgood Foster

     

    Additional Information at:

    http://mn.gov/dhs/people-we-serve/children-and-families/services/refugee-assistance/

    Mississippi - Oklahoma

    Mississippi

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Mississippi Department of Human Services

                Department of Child Protection Services

                Jackson, MS 39202

    ORR Funding FY2012: $800,000

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 23

     

    Services Include:

    • Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM) Program

    • Financial assistance

     

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Social and Community Services, Migration and Refugee Center (Biloxi, Jackson)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Jackson)

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Lorraine Hunter


    State Refugee Health Coordinator: 
    Patricia Williams


    ORR Regional Representative: 
    Faith Hurt

     

    Missouri

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Missouri Department of Social Services

                Office of Refugee Resettlement

                Columbia, MO 65203

    About:

    MDSS helps provide social and employment services, as well as financial and medical assistance, through programs provided by the Missouri Departments of Social Services, Health and Senior Services, Elementary and Secondary Education, and contracting agencies.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $5,324,960

    Persons Settled (2012): 1,250

     

    Services Include:

    • Food and Cash Assistance

    • Medical Assistance

    • Health Coordination

    • School Impact Program (assist with activities that lead to effective integration and education of refugee children)

    • Employment Assistance

    • Case management

    • ESL classes 

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCRI, International Institute of St. Louis (St. Louis)

    • USCRI, Jewish Vocational Service (Kansas City)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities of Central and Northern Missouri (Columbia, Jefferson City)

    • ECDC, Della Lamb Community Services (Kansas City)

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Kimberly O’Hara


    State Refugee Health Coordinator: 
    Thelma Myhre

    ORR State Analyst: Rezene Hagos

     

     

    Nebraska

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Program:

     

        Department of Health and Human Services

        Refugee Resettlement Program

        Lincoln, NE 68509

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $4,055,470

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 912

     

    Services Include:

    • Cash Assistance

    • Medical Assistance

    • Social Services

    • English Language Training 

    Affiliates and Services Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Social Services (Lincoln)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Family Services (Lincoln, Omaha)

    • ECDC, Southern Sudan Community Association (Omaha)

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Karen Parde


    State Refugee Health Coordinator: 
    Kristin Gall


    ORR State Analyst: 
    Rezene Hagos

     

    Additional Information at:

    http://dhhs.ne.gov/children_family_services/Pages/refugees.aspx

     

    New Hampshire

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Department of Health and Human Services

                Refugee Program

                129 Pleasant Street

                Concord, NH 03301

     

    About:

    Refugee Program staff work closely with the two New Hampshire voluntary resettlement agencies (volags), Ascentria Care Alliance and the International Institute of New Hampshire, as well as other area partners to support refugee integration.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $2,550,438

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 385

    Services Include:

    • Case Management

    • Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA)

    • English Language Training

    • Employment Services

    • Preventive Health

    • School Impact

    • Services for Older Refugees 

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS, Ascentria Care Alliance (Concord)

    • USCRI, International Institute of New Hampshire (Manchester)

    • CWS/EMM/LIRS, Lutheran Social Services (Concord)

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Barbara Seebart


    State Refugee Health Coordinator: 
    Laura McGlashan


    ORR Regional Representative: 
    Julie Munro

     

    Additional Information at:

    http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/omh/refugee/

     

     

    Nevada

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

        Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada

        Migration and Refugee Services (MRS)

                Las Vegas, NV, 89101

     

    ORR Funding FY2015: $11,626,553 (51%)– 49% through charitable donations and program fees (money for entire charity, not just refugee assistance.)

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,200

    Services Include:

    • Food, Shelter and Clothing

    • Health Services

    • Cultural Orientation

    • Case Management

    • Employment Services

    • Education

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • ECDC, African Community Center (Las Vegas)

    • USCCB, Refugee Assistance Program (Las Vegas) 

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Carisa Lopez.Ramirez

    State Refugee Health Coordinator: Carisa Lopez.Ramirez


    ORR Regional Office: 
    Bowa Tucker

               

    Additional Information at:

    http://www.catholiccharities.com/service_details/migration-refugee-services/

     

    New Jersey

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

        Department of Human Services

        Division of Family Development, Refugee Resettlement

        Trenton, NJ 08608

     

    About:

    Refugee Resettlement Program (RRP) is a federally funded program that provides cash and medical assistance to refugees.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $3,506,38

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 1,102

     

    Services Include:

    • Cash and Medical Assistance

    • ESL classes

    • Employment assistance

    • Case management

    • Basic needs support 

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Camden)

    • HIAS, Jewish Vocational Service of Metrowest (East Orange)

    • HIAS, Jewish Family and Vocational Service of Middlesex County (Milltown)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Elizabeth)

    • CWS, CWS Jersey City (Jersey City) 

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Annette Riordan


    State Refugee Health Coordinator: 
    TBA


    ORR State Analyst: 
    Pierrot Rugaba

     

    Additional Information at:

    http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/dfd/programs/refugee/

     

    New Mexico

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                New Mexico Human Services Department, Income Support Division

                Refugee Resettlement Program

                Albuquerque, NM 87110

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $2,002,743

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 315

     

    Services Include:

    • Cash and medical assistance

    • ESL classes

    • Employment services 

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • LIRS, Lutheran Family Services (Albuquerque)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities of Central New Mexico (Albuquerque)

    Contacts:

    State Refugee Coordinator: Socorro Salazar,


    State Refugee Health Coordinator: 
    Karen Gonzales


    ORR Regional Representative: 
    Ramon Colon

     

    New York

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

               

                New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance

                Bureau of Refugee and Immigrant Assistance

                Albany, New York 12243

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $23,738,715

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 12,471

     

    Services Include:

    • Help repatriated citizens arrive safely at home;

    • Provide assistance to victims of human trafficking; and

    • Assure proper foster care for unaccompanied refugee and entrant minors

    • Cash and medical assistance programs

    • Refugee School Impact Grant

    • Refugee Social Services Program

    • Response to Human Trafficking Program

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS/EMM Journey’s End Refugee Services, Inc. (Buffalo)

    • CWS/EMM, Interfaith Works of Central New York (Syracuse)

    • HIAS, FEGS Health and Human Services (New York)

    • HIAS, Jewish Family Service of Buffalo and Erie County (Buffalo)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee New York (New York)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of Metropolitan New York (New York)

    • LIRS, Mohawk Valley Resource Center (Utica)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Albany, Amityville, Brooklyn, New York, Syracuse)

    • USCCB/CWS, Catholic Family Center (Rochester)

    • USCRI, US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (Albany)

    • USCRI, American Civic Association (Binghamton)

    • USCRI, CAMBA (Brooklyn)

    • USCRI, International Institute of Buffalo (Buffalo)

    • Interfaith Works of Central New York (Syracuse)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Dodie Wheeler

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Thomas Keenan

                ORR Regional Representative: Julie Munro

    North Carolina

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

               

                North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services

                Refugee Services

                Raleigh, NC 27699

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $8,406,330

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,389

     

    Services Include:

    • Cash and medical assistance

    • Employment services

    • Case management

    • Transportation

    • Skills recertification

    • ESL training

    • Vocational skills training

    • Citizenships and immigration services

    • Translation and interpretation services

    • Social adjustment services 

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS, Church World Service Immigration and Refugee Program (Durham, Greensboro)

    • ECDC, North Carolina African Services Coalition (Greensboro)

    • EMM, Interfaith Refugee Ministry (Akron, New Bern)

    • HIAS, Carolina Refugee Resettlement Agency, Charlotte LIRS, Lutheran Family Services in the Carolinas (Raleigh)

    • WR, World Relief (Durham, High Point)

    • USCCB, Catholic Social Services of the Diocese of Charlotte (Charlotte)

    • USCRI, US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (Raleigh) 

    Contacts:      

                State Refugee Coordinator: Marlene Myers

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Jennifer Reed Morillo

                ORR Regional Representative: Faith Hurt

     

    North Dakota

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

               

                Lutheran Social Services

                Fargo, ND 58103

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $2,858,062

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 572

     

    Services Include:

    • Case management

    • Housing Assistance

    • ESL classes

    • Employment

    • Medical assistance

    • Counseling

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • LIRS/EMM, Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota (Fargo, Grand Forks, and Bismarck) 

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Shirley Dykshoorn

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Saurav Dahal

                ORR Regional Representative: Dee Daniels Scriven

     

     

     Ohio

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

               

                Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS)

                Ohio Refugee Services Program

                Columbus, Ohio 43218

               

    ORR Funding FY2012: $8,048,394

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,483

     

    Services Include:

    • Cash and Medical Assistance

    • Health screenings and services

    • Acculturation

    • English language training

    • Employment training

    • Job placement

    • Transportation

    • Child care

    • Citizenship classes

    • Translation & interpreter services

    • Referral services

    • Citizenship & naturalization service

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS/EMM, Community Refugee and Immigration Services (Columbus)

    • HIAS, US Together, Cleveland, Columbus (Toledo)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities SW Ohio (Cincinnati)

    • USCCB, Cleveland Catholic Charities, Cleveland (Cincinnati)

    • USCCB, Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley (Dayton)

    • USCRI, International Institute of Akron (Akron)

    • USCRI, The International Services Center (Cleveland)

    • WR, World Relief Columbus (Columbus) 

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Jennifer R. Johnson

                State Refugee Health Coordinator: Sandra Hollingsworth

                ORR Regional Representative: Chandra Allgood Foster

     

    Oklahoma

    (Public Private Partnership)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

               

    Department of Human Services
    Oklahoma City, OK 73105

     

    About:

    “Cash is provided through Oklahoma Catholic Charities. Medical assistance is provided through the SoonerCare (Medicaid) program. OKDHS also administers federal social service grants for refugees, monitoring provider contracts in Oklahoma City and Tulsa for employment services, English language training and social adjustment services.”

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $970,015

    Persons Settled (2012): 343

    Services Include:

    • Employment Services

    • ESL classes

    • Social adjustment services

    • Cash and medical assistance

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities, (Oklahoma City, Tulsa)

    • USCRI, YWCA Tulsa (Tulsa)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator: Melanie Silva

                ORR Regional Representative: Ramon Colon

    Oregon - Wisconsin

    Oregon

    (Public Private Partnership)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Oregon Department of Human Services

                500 Summer St. NE

                Salem, OR 9731

     

    About:

    “Services are provided through the Refugee Case Services Project (RCSP), which is a Public/Private Partnership between Oregon’s Department of Human Services (DHS) and the Voluntary Agencies that resettle refugees in this part of the state. Cash services are administered by the Volag for the first eight months in the U.S. under a contract from Oregon’s DHS.” The Voluntary Agencies include:

    1. Catholic Charities (CC)

    2. Lutheran Community Services Northwest (LCSNW)

    3. Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (SOAR)

    “English language, vocational training, employment supports, and job placement services are provided through the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO) to refugees for their first 12 months of residence in the U.S.”

                “Refugees who reside outside Multnomah, Washington, and Clackamas Counties are served in the local DHS branch office for cash assistance and SNAP while referrals are made to locally contracted agencies for Employment Services and to OHA for medical coverage.”

    ORR Funding FY2012: $5,519, 249

    Persons Settled (2012): 997

    Services Include:

    • English Language classes

    • Vocational training

    • Employment services

    • Job Placement services

    • Cash assistance

    • Case management

    • Cultural Orientation

    • Health Screenings

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS, Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (Portland)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Community Services Northwest (Portland)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Portland)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Rhonda Prodzinski, (503) 945-6108,                                                                 Rhonda.prodzinski@state.or.us

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Tasha Wheatt-Delancy, (503) 988-9204, Tasha.wheatt-delancy@multco.us

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Jordan Becker, (206) 615-3637, Jordan.Becker@acf.hhs.gov

    Article on the overhaul of state refugee health care system:

    https://multco.us/global/news/county-staff-lead-overhaul-state-refugee-health-care-system

     

    Pennsylvania

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare

                The Pennsylvania Refugee Resettlement Program

                625 Forster St

                Harrisburg, PA 17120

                RA-HSRefugeeProgram@pa.gov

                http://www.refugeesinpa.org/index.htm

     

    About:

    Responsibility for the Refugee Resettlement Program rests with the State Refugee Coordinator, designated by the Secretary of Welfare. The Program is overseen by the PA Department of Human Services. Cash and Medical Assistance programs, administered by the Office of Income Maintenance, are coordinated with the delivery of employment, educational, aging and allied human services, administered by the Bureau of Employment and Training in the Office of Income Maintenance.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $20,496,542

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 3,464

     

    Services Include:

    • Employment Programs

    • English as a Second Language (ESL) programs

    • Targeted Assistance

    • Interpretation and Translation

    • Citizenship Preparation courses

    • Asylee Outreach Project

    • Services to Older Refugees

    • Information Referral

    • Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program

    • Vocational ESL for Cuban and Haitian refugees

    • TANF employment and training programs

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS, Church World Service (Lancaster)

    • HIAS, HIAS Pennsylvania (Philadelphia)

    • HIAS, Jewish Family and Children’s Service of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Children and Family Services of Eastern Pennsylvania (Allentown, Lancaster, Philadelphia, Rosyln)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Pittsburgh, Erie, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh, Scranton)

    • USCRI, International Institute of Erie (Erie)

    • USCRI, Nationalities Service Center (Philadelphia)

    • USCRI, North Area Multi-Service Center of Allegheny County (Pittsburgh)

    Refugee Resettlement Fact Sheet: http://www.refugeesinpa.org/GettheFacts/index.htm

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Charlotte Fry, (717) 346-1095, charfry@pa.gov

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Asresu Misikir, (717) 787-3350, amisikir@state.pa.us

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Pierrot Rugaba, (202) 401-6891, pierrot.rugaba@acf.hhs.gov

     

    Rhode Island

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Rhode Island Department of Health

                Refugee Health Program

                3 Capitol Hill,

                Providence, RI 02908

               

    About:

    “The Rhode Island Department of Health initiated a Refugee Health Program in November of 2003 and serves as the refugee resettlement office for the state. Primary program services include cash and medical assistance, access to English as a second language classes, vocational and employment assistance. Discretionary grants are also awarded to private agencies for various other self-sufficiency programs.”

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $787,475

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 170

     

    Services Include:

    • Basic needs assistance (housing, food, enrolling in schools, etc.)

    • Cultural orientation and skills building programs

    • Assistance accessing healthcare

    • English as a Second Language and Workforce education programs

    • Employment services (job training & placement)

    • Ongoing advocacy and case management to insure self-sufficiency

    • Cash and medical assistance

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Immigration & Refugee Services, Catholic Diocese of Rhode Island (Providence)

    • USCRI, International Institute of Rhode Island (Providence)

    Contact:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Frederick Sneesby, (401) 462-1669, Frederick.Sneesby@dhs.ri.gov

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Perry Gast, (401) 222-5940, Perry.Gast@health.ri.gov

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Julie Munro, (617) 565-3671, julie.munro@acf.hhs.gov

     

     

    South Carolina

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

               

                South Carolina Department of Social Services

                Refugee Resettlement Program

                1535 Confederate Avenue
    Columbia, SC 29201-1915

     

    About:

    “The Federal Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) provides funds, policy and over-site; but services are administered by the state.”

                “All services are coordinated through the Refugee Resettlement Services Unit at the State Office, as well as through private and non-profit service agencies under contract with the state to provide specialized services to refugees.”

    ORR Funding FY2012: $594,830

    Persons Settled (2012): 196

    Services Include:

    • Refugee Cash Assistance

    • Refugee Medical Assistance

    • Employability services

    • Case management

    • ESL classes

    • Translation and interpretation services

    • Citizenship preparation

    • Social adjustment services

    Affiliates & Service Providers:

    • Lutheran Family Services in the Carolinas (Columbia)

    • World Relief Spartanburg (Spartanburg)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Dorothy Addison, (803) 898-0989, dorothy.addison@dss.sc.gov

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Faith Hurt, (404) 562-2847, faith.hurt@acf.hhs.gov

     

     

    South Dakota

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

               

                Lutheran Social Services of South Dakota

                Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service

                705 East 41st Street, Suite 200

                Sioux Falls, SD 57105

                (P): 605-444-7500

                info@LssSD.org

     

    About:

    LSS began providing resettlement services for refugees as early as 1948 in aiding Europeans displaced following WWII.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $3,668,585

    Persons Settled (2012): 650

    Services Include:

    • Community orientation

    • Case management

    • Employment services

    • English classes

    • Citizenship classes

    • Immigration services

    • Interpreter services

     

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • LSS is assisted in providing these services through various locally based ECBOs.

     

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Tim Jurgens, (605) 731-2015, tim.jurgens@lsssd.org

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Kristin Rounds, (605) 773-4470, kristin.rounds@state.sd.us

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Dee Daniels Scriven, (303) 844-1147,                                                               Dee.DanielsScriven@acf.hhs.gov

     

     

    Tennessee

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Catholic Charities of Tennessee

                Tennessee Office for Refugees (TOR)

                2806 McGavock Pike
    Nashville, TN 37214
    (P): (615) 352-3087 

    ORR Funding FY2012: $11,679,364

    Persons Settled (2012): 1,633

    Services Include:

    • Medical Screenings

    • Employment and case management services

    • English language training

    • Preventative health services

    • Support refugee integrations into local school systems

    • Cash and medical assistance programs

    • Employment services

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • CWS, Bridge Refugee Services (Knoxville)

    • ECDC, Nashville International Center for Empowerment (Nashville)

    • EMM, Bridge Refugee Services Inc. (Chattanooga, Knoxville)

    • USCCB, Refugee and Immigration Services (Nashville, Memphis)

    • WR, World Relief (Memphis, Nashville)

    Contacts:

                TOR Department Director

                Kelly Branson, (615) 259-3567 [ext. 777], kbranson@cctenn.org

     

                TOR Resettlement Coordinator

                Nancy Salyer, (615) 259-3567 [ext. 770], nsalyer@cctenn.org

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Holly Johnson, (615) 354-5700, hjohnson@cctenn.org

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Michael Evans, (615) 352-9520, mevans@cctenn.org

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Faith Hurt, (404) 562-2847, faith.hurt@acf.hhs.gov

     

    Texas

    (Public Private Partnership)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Texas Health & Human Services Commission

                Office of Immigration & Refugee Affairs

                909 W 45th St

                Austin, TX 78751

                (P): (512) 206-5084

     

    About:

    “The OIRA was created by the Texas Legislature in 1991 to distribute federal funds available through the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and the Refugee Act of 1980.”

    ORR Funding FY2012: $43,657,879

    Persons Settled (2012): 8,372

    Services Include:

    • Temporary cash assistance

    • Medical assistance

    • Education services

    • ESL classes

    • Employment services and vocational training

    • Citizenship assistance

    • Case management

    • Unaccompanied minors program

    • Refugee school impact program

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Abilene, Amarillo, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio)

    • CWS/EMM/LIRS, Refugee Services of Texas Inc. (Amarillo, Austin, Texas, Fort Worth, Houston)

    • USCCB, Catholic Family Services (Amarillo)

    • USCCB, Caritas of Austin (Austin)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Corpus Christi, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, Lewisville, San Antonio)

    • USCCB, Diocesan Migrant and Refugee Services (El Paso)

    • WR, World Relief (Fort Worth)

    • AECDC, lliance for Multicultural Community Services (Houston)

    • CWS/EMM, Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston (Houston)

    • USCRI, YMCA International Services (Houston)

    Full contact list for local organizations assisting refugees:

                http://www.hhsc.state.tx.us/programs/refugee/Contact-List.pdf

     

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Patrick Randall, (512) 206-5129, Patrick.Randall@hhsc.state.tx.us

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Jessica Montour, (512) 533-3161, Jessica.Montour@dshs.state.tx.us

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Ramon Colon, (214) 767-2977, ramon.colon@acf.hhs.gov

     

     

     

    Utah

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                           

                Department of Workforce Services

                Refugee Services Office (RSO)

                250 West 3900 South
    Salt Lake City, UT 8410

                (P): (801) 618-5096

                refugeeoffice@utah.gov

    About:

    While RSO is designated as the state resettlement office, in Utah there are two resettlement agencies: the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and Catholic Community Services (CCS). Services are provided with the help of local community organizations and volunteer groups.

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $12,064,884

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 1,012

    Services Include:

    • Housing assistance

    • Airport Pickup

    • Orientation

    • Employment assistance

    • ESL classes

    • Educational services and resources

    • Health services

    • Counseling and youth programs

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Salt Lake City)

    • USCCB, Catholic Community Services of Utah (Salt Lake City)

    Contacts:

                RSO Director/State Refugee Coordinator

                Gerald Brown, (801) 526-9787, geraldbrown@utah.gov

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Amelia Self, (801) 538-6221, aself@utah.gov

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Dee Daniels Scriven, (303) 844-1147, Dee.DanielsScriven@acf.hhs.gov

               

     

               

    Vermont

    (Wilson Fish)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

                Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program

                U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants

                462 Hegeman Ave., Suite 101

                Colchester, VT 05446

                (P): (802) 654-1700

                vrrp@uscrivt.org

     

    About:

    VRRP is Vermont's local field office of the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, and has been operating for over 30 years. Services are provided with the help of various local community organizations.

    ORR Funding FY2012: $2,242,253

     

    Persons Settled (2012): 362

     

    Services Include:

    • Reception at the airport

    • Interpretation and translation

    • Cultural orientation

    • Housing assistance

    • Basic furnishings and housing wares

    • English language training

    • Employment counseling

    • Professional, culturally appropriate support

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • Association of Africans Living in Vermont (AALV)

    Contacts:

                VRRP Director

                Amila Merdzanovic

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Denise Lamoureux, (802) 241-0429, Denise.Lamoureux@vermont.gov

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Martha Friedman, (802) 863-7344, Martha.Friedman@vermont.gov

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Julie Munro, (617) 565-3671, julie.munro@acf.hhs.gov

    Virginia

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS)

                801 E. Main Street

                Richmond, VA 23219

                (P): (804) 726-7000

                citizen.services@dss.virginia.gov

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $11, 689,754

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,820

     

    Services Include:

    • Case management

    • Employment placement and orientation

    • Adult English instruction and educational planning

    • Family mentorship

    • Housing assistance

    • Cultural orientation

    • ESL classes

    • Transportation orientation and assistance

    • Employment services 

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Arlington, Fredericksburg, Manassas)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Charlottesville, Richmond)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area (Falls Church)

    • CWS, Church World Service (Richmond, Harrisonburg)

    • USCCB, Commonwealth Catholic Charities (Richmond, Hampton, Roanoke)

    Full Contact List at: http://www.dss.virginia.gov/files/division/cvs/rr/benefits_services/access_benefits_services/Refugee_Resettlement_Providers_030816.pdf

     

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Kathy Cooper, (804) 726-7927, Kathy.Cooper@dss.virginia.gov

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Jill Grumbine, (804) 864-7911, jill.grumbine@vdh.virginia.gov

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Pierrot Rugaba, (202) 401-6891, pierrot.rugaba@acf.hhs.gov

     

    Washington

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Washington Department of Social and Health Services

                Economic Services Administration, Office of Refugee and Immigrant Assistance

                4045 Delridge Way SW #300

                Seattle, WA 98106

                (P): (877) 501-2233

     

    ORR Funding FY2012: $17,553,062

    Persons Settled (2012): 2,860

    Services Include:

    • Cash and Medical Assistance

    • ESL classes

    • Vocational and employment assistance

    • Naturalization assistance

    • Case management

    • Cultural Orientation and Advanced Cultural Orientation

    • Self Sufficiency Education Workshop

    • Immigration assistance

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • EMM, Diocese of Olympia (Seattle)

    • HIAS, Jewish Family Service (Seattle, Kent)

    • IRC, International Rescue Committee (Seattle)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Community Services Northwest (Seattle, Vancouver)

    • USCCB, Catholic Community Services of Western Washington (Tacoma)

    • WR, World Relief (Richland, Kent, Spokane)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Sarah K. Peterson, (206) 568-5568, sarah.peterson@dshs.wa.gov

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Jasmine Matheson, (206) 418-5500, Jasmine.matheson@doh.wa.gov

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Jordan Becker, (206) 615-3637, Jordan.Becker@acf.hhs.gov

     

     

     

    West Virginia

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Program:

                West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources

                4190 Washington St W

                Charleston, WV 25313

                (P): (304) 746-2360

    ORR Funding FY2012: $95,000

    Persons Settled (2012): 71

    Services Include:

    • Immigration legal services

    • ESL classes

    • Job placement and employment assistance

    • Cash and Medical Assistance

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Charleston)

    Contacts:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Monica Hamilton, (304) 356-4619, Monica.A.Hamilton@wv.gov

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Pierrot Rugaba, (202) 401-6891, pierrot.rugaba@acf.hhs.gov

     

     

    Wisconsin

    (State Administered)

    State Refugee Resettlement Office:

     

                Wisconsin Department of Children and Families

                Refugee Services Section

                819 North 6th Street, Room 670
    Milwaukee, WI 53203

     

    About:

    Programs and services are provided through contracts with local refugee service provider agencies and consortia that support refugees resettling those communities.”

    ORR Funding FY2012: $5,271,645

    Persons Settled (2012): 785

    Services Include:

    • Refugee cash and medical assistance

    • Employment services

    • Health screenings

    • Mental and preventative health services

    • ESL classes

    • Case management

    Affiliates and Service Providers:

    • ECDC, Pan-African Community Association (Milwaukee)

    • LIRS, Lutheran Social Services of Wisconsin & Upper Michigan (Madison, Milwaukee)

    • USCCB, Catholic Charities (Green Bay, Milwaukee, Sheboygan)

    • USCRI, International Institute of Wisconsin (Milwaukee)

    • WR, World Relief (Oshkosh)

    Contact:

                State Refugee Coordinator

                Mette Brogden, (414) 220-6826, mette.brogden@wisconsin.gov

     

                State Refugee Health Coordinator

                Savitri J. Tsering, (608) 267-3733, Savitri.tsering@dhs.wisconsin.gov

     

                ORR Regional Representative

                Chandra Allgood Foster (312) 886-9539, Chandra.AllgoodFoster@acf.hhs.gov


Voluntary Agencies

Profile: VOLAGs

  • Church World Services (CWS)

    Mission: Feed the hungry, clothe the naked, heal the sick, comfort the aged, shelter the homeless

    Funding Source:

    Investment income, community/public appeals (fundraising like CROP Walk), donated materials, member communions and organizations’ contributions, US Government Support (grants from various government agencies) primarily recognized during period in which expenses are incurred, with the exception of the US Reception and Placement Program, in which support is based on the number of refugees being resettled (FY 2013 Audited Financial Statements, 11).

            Funds then funneled into CWS programs. “Direct expenses of CWS programs include grants in support of globally affiliated agencies’ programs and projects, shipments of donated materials, purchase and land transportation of relief commodities and materials, and costs of refugee resettlement. Resettlement costs include housing, food, transportation, and social services for resettled refugees,” (FY 2013 Audited Financial Statements, 12).

    2013 Annual Report (no PDF file—only online): http://www.cwsglobal.org/who-we-are/annual-report/fy-2013/

    General CWS Field Offices (22): http://www.cwsglobal.org/where-we-work/northamerica/north-america-cws-offices.html

               

                Immigration and Refugee Program Offices (7):

    Miami, FL             Church World Service/ IRP Miami
    Palm Beach, FL            Church World Service/IRP Palm Beach

    Greensboro, NC        CWS Greensboro
    Durham, NC            CWS Durham
    Lancaster, PA            CWS Lancaster

    Harrisonburg, VA        CWS/IRP Harrisonburg
    Richmond, VA             CWS/IRP Richmond

     

                Immigration and Refugee Program Affiliates (27):

    Phoenix, AZ            Lutheran Social Services of the Southwest
    Los Angeles, CA        Interfaith Refugee & Immigration Service
    Sacramento, CA         Opening Doors, Inc.
    Denver, CO            Ecumenical Refugee Services, Inc.
    New Haven, CT            Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services
    Atlanta, GA            Refugee Resettlement and Immigration Services of Atlanta
    Chicago, IL            RefugeeOne
    Indianapolis, IN            Exodus Refugee/Immigration, Inc.
    South Bend, IN            American Red Cross – St. Joseph County Chapter
    Louisville, KY            Kentucky Refugee Ministries, Inc.
    Lexington, KY            Kentucky Refugee Ministries, Inc.
    Grand Rapids, MI         Bethany Christian Services Refugee Resettlement Program
    Minneapolis, MN        Minnesota Council of Churches
    Lincoln, NE            Lutheran Refugee Services
    Omaha, NE             Lutheran Refugee Services
    Concord, NH            Interfaith Refugee Resettlement Program
    Buffalo, NY            Journey’s End Refugee Services, Inc.
    Rochester, NY            Catholic Family Center- Refugee Resettlement Program
    Syracuse, NY             InterFaith Works of Central New York
    Columbus, OH             Community Refugee and Immigration Services (CRIS)
    Portland, OR            SOAR
    Knoxville, TN            Bridge Refugee Services, Inc.
    Austin, TX            Refugee Services of Texas, Inc. – Austin
    Amarillo, TX            Refugee Services of Texas, Inc. – Amarillo
    Dallas, TX            Refugee Services of Texas – Dallas
    Ft. Worth, TX             Refugee Services of Texas – Fort Worth

    Houston, TX            Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston

     

    Affiliates: (37 Member Communions)

    African Methodist Episcopal Church: http://www.ame-church.com/

    African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church: http://www.amez.org/

    Alliance of Baptists: http://www.allianceofbaptists.org/

    American Baptist Churches USA: http://www.abc-usa.org/

    Apostolic Catholic Church: http://www.apostoliccatholicchurch.com/

    Armenian Church of America (including Diocese of California):             http://www.armenianchurch.org/

    Christian Church (Disciples of Christ): http://www.disciples.org/

    Christian Methodist Episcopal Church: http://www.c-m-e.org/

    Church of the Brethren: http://www.brethren.org/

    Community of Christ: http://www.cofchrist.org/

    The Coptic Orthodox Church in North America: http://www.coptic.org/north_am.htm

    The Episcopal Church: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/

    Evangelical Lutheran Church in America: http://www.elca.org/

    Friends United Meeting: http://www.fum.org/

    Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America: http://www.goarch.org/

    Hungarian Reformed Church in America: http://www.calvinsynod.org/

    International Council of Community Churches: http://www.icccusa.com/

    Korean Presbyterian Church in America: http://www.kpca.org/

    Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church: http://mosc.in/

    Mar Thoma Church: http://marthomanae.org/

    Moravian Church in America: http://www.moravian.org/

    National Baptist Convention in America: http://www.nbcainc.com/

    National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., Inc.: http://www.nationalbaptist.com/

    National Missionary Baptist Convention of America: http://www.nmbca.com/

    Orthodox Church in America: http://www.oca.org/

    Patriarchal Parishes of the Russian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A.:       http://www.russianchurchusa.org/

    Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends:            http://www.pym.org/index.php

    Polish National Catholic Church of America: http://www.pncc.org/

    Presbyterian Church (USA): http://www.pcusa.org/

    Progressive National Baptist Convention, Inc.: http://pnbc.org/

    Reformed Church in America: http://www.rca.org/

    Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada:        http://westsrbdio.org/directory/index.html

    The Swedenborgian Church: http://www.swedenborg.org/

    Syrian Orthodox Church of Antioch: http://syrianorthodoxchurch.org/

    Ukrainian Orthodox Church in America: http://www.uocofusa.org/

    United Church of Christ: http://www.ucc.org/

    The United Methodist Church: http://www.umc.org/

    Program Areas of Focus

    Hunger and Malnutrition

                    Zero Hunger Challenge:

    Goals: Zero stunted children less than 2 years, 100% access to adequate food all year round, all food systems are sustainable, 100% increase in smallholder            productivity and income, zero loss or waste of food.

    Methods: treating malnutrition, getting children the right food within their first 1000 days, empowering women, prioritizing family farming, making food systems sustainable

                    CROP Hunger Walk

    Works as a fundraiser around the U.S., with funds going toward ending hunger        emergencies

                    US Emergency Response Program

    A national disaster recovery program

                    ACT Alliance

     Founding member of this global disaster recovery program

     

    Refugees

                    Refugee Resettlement

    CWS works with Immigration and Refugee Program offices and affiliates, participating denominations, local congregations, other local voluntary organizations including student bodies, and individual volunteers to help resettle refugees. Services include ensuring that refugees have food, clothing, and other essentials, employment search assistance, helping to learn English, figuring out transportation, enrolling children in school, overall assistance to achieve self-sufficiency

                    Cuban Haitian Entrant Program

    CWS partners with US Conference of Catholic Bishops in US Citizenship and Immigration Services of US DHS in program to provide processing and resettlement services to those who qualify as Cuban and Haitian entrants

                    Resettlement Support Center Africa (Nairobi, Kenya)

    Assistance to refugee applicants through providing applications, interviewing,           determining eligibility, overseas cultural orientation, RSC also compiles             information to match refugee applicants with resettlement sponsors in the U.S. if     approved

                    Urban refugee work (2012: Cameroon, Indonesia, Pakistan)

    Conducted analysis of relationship between urban refugees and host communities through surveys, interviews, and focus groups. Findings: “urban refugees' lives tend to improve over time and that these improvements are associated with more frequent and positive interactions with their hosts. It also reaffirmed the importance of strengthening refugees' rights and improving community infrastructure, employment opportunities and social services in order to improve the lives of all urban residents, both refugees and nationals alike.” (see study PDF)

                Protection services

    CWS provides trainings across the globe to educate staff and partners regarding protection, advocacy of forcibly displaced people

                Protracted displacement

    CWS works in country offices to provide forcibly displaced people in eight countries with health care, vocational training, post-primary education, expanded livelihood opportunities, legal assistance/monitoring, advocacy for rights and protection

     

    Immigration

                    Legal services http://www.cwsglobal.org/what-we-do/immigration/legal-services/

    Adjustment of status for refugees/asylees, travel documents, employment                       authorization documents, petitions for family members to join refugees/asylees/US citizens/fiancés in US, applications for asylum, self-petitions for battered immigrant spouses and children, naturalization, diversity visa lottery applications, applications   for deferred action, replacement of lost green cards, applications for temporary         protected status

                    Religious services http://www.cwsglobal.org/what-we- do/immigration/religious-services/

    Opportunities for individual/group worship, clearance of special diets according to religious practices, pastoral visits/care/counseling, ongoing spiritual care and compassion for RSP detainees and staff, crisis intervention, religious education, advice to SPC personnel concerning religious practices

    Children

        Empowering children and their mothers through literacy programs, bringing            HIV/AIDS orphaned children together, post-disaster recovery services,

    Water

        Community-based solutions to clean water access through helping to establish         village water councils, routine maintenance, informing communities about water        rights, safe hygiene practices

    CWS Board of Directors:

    Rev. Dr. Earl Trent, Chair
    Rev. Patricia de Jong, 1st Vice Chair
    Rev. Rafael Malpica-Padilla, 2nd Vice Chair
    Mr. Donald C. Clark, Jr., Esq., Secretary
    Mr. Roland Fernandes, Treasurer
    Rt. Rev. Johncy Itty, Immediate Past Chair
    Mr. Nabil Samuel Abadir
    Dr. Paul Chan
    Mr. Hal Culbertson
    Rev. Amy C. Gopp
    Rev. Jimmie R. Hawkins
    Mr. Daniel Hazman
    Dr. Eunice K. Kamaara
    Fr. Michael Kontogiorgis
    Ms. Joyce Lehman
    Rev. John L. McCullough
    Ms. Lenann McGookey Gardner
    Mr. James Morris
    Mr. Peter M. Persell
    Ms. Laura Roberts

    CWS Staff:

               Rev. John L. McCullough, President and CEO

                Maurice A. Bloem, Executive Vice-President

                Ann Walle, Director of Innovation and Strategic Affairs

               James Landis, Vice President of Program Operations

                Donna Derr, Director of Development and Humanitarian Assistance

                Diana Church, Deputy Director

                Barry Shade, Associate Director for Domestic Response

               Daniel Tyler, Africa Regional Coordinator

               Marvin Parvez, Asia/Pacific Regional Coordinator

               Martin Coria, Latin America and Caribbean Regional Coordinator

               Steve Weaver, Middle East Regional Coordinator

               Erol Kekic, Director, Immigration and Refugee Program

               Sarah Krause, Deputy Director

               Tara Pinkham, Associate Director for Immigration Services

               Andrew Fuys, Associate Director for International Programs

               Sandra Vines, Associate Director, Resettlement & Integration

               Jen Smyers, Associate Director for Immigration and Refugee Policy

               Robin Dunn Marcos, RSC Africa Director

               Beth Oppenheim, Associate Director for Resource Generation

               Martin Shupack, Director of Advocacy

               Joanne Rendall, Chief Financial Officer and Deputy Director for Operations

               Rev. Joseph Roberson, Associate to the Deputy of Operations

               Bernard A. Kirchhoff Jr., Director of Human Resources

               William E. Wildey, Vice President for Development

               Catherine Powers, Director of Regional Fundraising

               Ronald Blaum, Planned Gift Officer

               Thomas Hampson, Director of Donor Relations

               Matt Hackworth, Director of Marketing and Communications

    Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM)

    Mission:

    Episcopal Migration Ministries builds a foundation for individuals forced from home and country to thrive in communities across the United States.

    Vision:

    To uphold the dignity of every human being by advancing our nation’s legacy of welcome.

     

    Field Office: 1 (Headquarters)

    Based out of the Missionary Society of the Episcopal Church offices in New York City

    Affiliates: 30 (26 Episcopal dioceses in 22 states)

    Diocese of Arizona (Refugee Focus): http://www.refugeefocus.org/who-we-are/     & http://www.lss-sw.org/refugee-immigration.asp

    Diocese of Atlanta (New American Pathways): http://newamericanpathways.org/

    Diocese of Central New York (Interfaith Works of Central NY New Americans):          http://www.interfaithworkscny.org/

    Diocese of Chicago (RefugeeOne): http://www.refugeeone.org/

    Diocese of Colorado (Ecumenical Refugee & Immigration Services):     http://www.ersden.org/

    Episcopal Church in Connecticut (Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services):        http://irisct.org/

    Diocese of East Carolina (New Bern) (Interfaith Refugee Ministry):     http://www.helpingrefugees.org/

    Diocese of East Carolina (Wilmington) (Interfaith Refugee Ministry): http://www.helpingrefugees.org/

    Diocese of East Tennessee (Knoxville) (Bridge Refugee Services):        http://www.bridgerefugees.org/

    Diocese of East Tennessee (Chattanooga) (Bridge Refugee Services): http://www.bridgerefugees.org/

    Diocese of Florida (Lutheran Social Services of Northeast Florida):       http://lssjax.org/

    Diocese of Idaho (Agency for New Americans): http://www.anaidaho.org/

    Diocese of Indianapolis (Exodus Refugee/Immigration Inc.):     http://www.exodusrefugee.org/

    Diocese of Kansas (Episcopal Wichita-Area Refugee Ministry): http://www.ewarm.org/

    Diocese of Kentucky (Louisville) (Kentucky Refugee Ministries):          http://www.kyrm.org/

    Diocese of Lexington (Kentucky Refugee Ministries): http://www.kyrm.org/

    Diocese of Los Angeles (Interfaith Refugee & Immigration Services of the       Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles): http://iris.ladiocese.org/

    Diocese of Michigan (Southfield) (Lutheran Social Services of Michigan):        http://www.lssm.org/

    Episcopal Church in Minnesota (Minnesota Council of Churches):        http://www.mnchurches.org/refugeeservices/

    Diocese of New Hampshire (Ascentria Care Alliance): http://www.ascentria.org/

    Diocese of North Dakota-Fargo (Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota):    http://www.lssnd.org/

    Diocese of North Dakota-Grand Forks (Lutheran Social Services of North         Dakota): http://www.lssnd.org/

    Diocese of Olympia (Diocese of Olympia Refugee Resettlement Office):            http://www.dioceserroseattle.org/

    Diocese of Southeast Florida (Episcopal Migration Ministries-Miami): http://www.diosef.org/ministries/episcopal-migration-ministries.shtml

    Diocese of Southern Ohio (Community Refugee & Immigration Services):       http://www.crisohio.org/

    Diocese of Texas (Refugee Services of Texas, Austin): http://www.rstx.org/

    Diocese of Texas (Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston): https://imgh.org/

    Diocese of Western Massachusetts (Ascentria Care Alliance):    http://www.ascentria.org/

    Diocese of Western Michigan (Grand Rapids) (Lutheran Social Services of      Michigan): http://www.lssm.org/

    Diocese of Western New York (Journey’s End Refugee Services):          http://jersbuffalo.org/

    Funding Source:

                Matching Grant program

    Fundraising/private funds “required $1.00 match for every $2.00 provided by the Office of Refugee Resettlement” (EMM 2012 Annual Report, p. 7). These funds provide services for refugees’ first six months in the United States.

                Reception and Placement Program

    Funded by Department of State Bureau for Populations, Refugees, and Migration provides immediate necessities for refugees’ first 90 days in the United States.

    Private donations from church congregations, volunteers, and individuals assist Matching Grant program, overall work of EMM as well.

    Program Areas of Focus

                Matching Grant program

    For refugees’ first six months, this program provides long-term needs like vocational training, ESL training, job placement assistance. Individual programs at affiliate sites aid refugees in finding medical care, educational opportunities, and community connections.

                Reception and Placement Program

    For refugees’ first 90 days in the United States, this program provides immediate needs like food, clothing, furnishings, health screenings, housing, case management, orientation to transportation systems, and health and public safety services

                Co-Sponsorship

    Episcopal congregations/parishes matched with refugee families to provide support as they become self-sufficient, emotionally stable, and adjust to the culture. Sponsors help with community orientation, transportation, applying for government documents, searching for employment, and providing initial material goods. Commitment lasts less than six months.

                Travel loan services

    International Organization for Migration arranges loan program that assists refugees’ travel to the United States. Refugees sign promissory note to pay back this loan (interest free) within a pre-determined time period. EMM and Domestic & Foreign Missionary Society manage repayment process

                Episcopal Church’s response to the Central American migrant crisis

    “We urge Congress and the Administration continue to provide appropriate, child-centered care for these children, while maintaining access to protection and services for all refugee populations.” Currently mapping work in response to Central American migrant crisis in diocese across the U.S.

     

    Executive Leadership and Office Management Team:

    Deborah Stein, EMM Director
    Demetrio Alvero, EMM Deputy Director
    Rose Pridgen, Office Manager

    Post-Arrival Team:

    Kurt Bonz, Program Manager 
    Heather Joseph, Program Manager
    Julie Petrie, Program Manager
    Jessica Lilley, Program Associate
    Marc Mousky, Program Associate
    Laura Lamb, Program Associate
    Elena Lukic, Program Associate


    Pre-Arrival Team:

    Svetlana Brajdic, Senior Program Manager

    Kaitlyn Mullen, Program Associate

    Church Relations and Communications Team:

    Allison Duvall, Program Manager for Church Relations
    Program Manager for Communications, Position currently vacant

     

    Episcopal Church Policy on Immigration and Refugee Issues: http://library.episcopalchurch.org/article/summary-episcopal-church-policy-immigration-and-refugee-issues

     

    EMM e-Newsletter Archive: http://library.episcopalchurch.org/page/episcopal-migration-ministries-e-newsletter

    Ethipian Community Development Council (ECDC)

    Mission

    To develop programs that respond to the needs of newcomers to the country and to increase awareness about refugee and newcomer issues at home and abroad. (Unofficial)

     

    Field Offices: 3 ECDC Branch Offices, 1 Subsidiary Office

    ECDC African Community Center (Arlington, VA & Silver Spring, MD)

    ECDC African Community Center (Denver, CO): http://www.acc-den.org/

    ECDC African Community Center (Las Vegas, NV): http://acclv.org/

    ECDC Enterprise Development Group (Arlington, VA)

    Affiliates (13):

    Phoenix, AZ (Arizona Immigrant and Refugee Services): http://www.rircaz.org/

    Anaheim, CA (East African Community of Orange County): http://www.eastafrikan.org/

    San Diego, CA (Alliance for African Assistance): http://www.alliance-for-africa.org/

    Clearwater, FL (Coptic Orthodox Charities, Inc.): http://www.copticcharities.com/

    Chicago, IL (Ethiopian Community Association of Chicago): http://www.ecachicago.org/

    Worcester, MA (Refugee and Immigrant Assistance Center): http://www.riacboston.org/

    Kansas City, MO (Della Lamb Community Services): http://www.dellalamb.org/

    Omaha, NE (Southern Sudan Community Association): http://www.sscaomaha.org/

    Greensboro, NC (North Carolina African Services Coalition): http://www.ascafrica.org/

    Pittsburgh, PA (Acculturation for Justice, Access, and Peace Outreach):            http://www.ajapopittsburgh.org/

    Nashville, TN (Nashville International Center for Empowerment):        http://www.empowernashville.org/

    Houston, TX (Alliance for Multicultural Community Services):   http://www.allianceontheweb.org/

    Milwaukee, WI (Pan-African Community Association): http://www.panafricoma.org/

     

    Funding Source:

    “Support for ECDC is derived from individual contributions, in-kind donations, corporations, faith-based organizations, and contracts/grants from federal, state, and local government agencies” (2014 Conference Booklet, p.2). ECDC is a member of InterAction and the Refugee Council USA.

                Resettlement and Placement program

    Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration provides funding for the R&P program. Branch offices and affiliates use this funding toward the immediate necessities of newly arrived refugees.

                Matching Grant

    Funded by Office of Refugee Resettlement and matched private funds. Through the MG program, ECDC’s affiliates provide a range of services to help clients obtain employment quickly. In addition to these direct employment services, affiliates provide maintenance assistance in the form of a monthly cash allowance, rent and utilities payments, and funds for transportation.

                Preferred Communities program

    Funded by the Office of Refugee Resettlement, helps select branch and affiliate offices with case management, provide newly-arrived refugees with immediate needs and services.

                Individual Development Accounts program

    Funded by the Office of Refugee Resettlement. Federal funds match refugees’ savings for first time home/vehicle purchases, college tuition payments, microenterprise start-up expenses.

                Technical Assistance

    Office of Refugee Resettlement funds the national Mutual Assistance Associations Innovation in Technical Assistance program, which granted money to ECDC to provide technical assistance to ethnic community based organizations (ECBOs). “ECBOs that are serving refugees according to ORR’s definition and provisions are eligible to apply for the MITA program, regardless of whether they have now or in the past received funding from ORR.”

    Program Areas of Focus

                Reception and Placement program

    Work with refugees for their first 30 days in the United States (can be extended to 90 days) by providing housing and household supplies, food, clothing, school enrollment help, English language programs, employment services, health screenings to help refugees become self-sufficient

                Matching Grant program

    Supplements R&P program with employment services to refugees, asylees, victims of trafficking, Cuban/Haitian entrants, certain Amerasians from Vietnam, and Special Immigrant Visa holders with the goal to secure employment within immigrants’ first 120-180 days in the U.S. This program also provides maintenance assistance through rent, utilities, transportation costs, and monthly financial aid.

                Preferred Communities Program

    Provides support to new refugees without family or social connections in their new communities, or to refugees who have special needs with thorough case management. This program also serves as a supplementary fundraising, volunteer, in-kind donation repository especially for newly arrived refugees. This program is only administered in selected affiliate sites.

                Individual Development Accounts Program

    Administered at Las Vegas branch location, seeks to assist refugees with limited financial resources to save money towards education and asset building. Also provides refugees with financial literacy to understand budgeting, banking, turning savings into an asset, the importance of good credit. This program collaborates with local banks and community partners.

                Other Social Services

    ECDC also provides services like immigration counseling, youth and after school projects, domestic violence education, health programs like HIV testing, breast cancer awareness, and diabetes education

                Strengthen Ethnic Community Based Organizations

    ECDC provides technical assistance to selected Ethnic Community Based Organizations (ECBOs) through the Office of Refugee Resettlement’s Mutual Assistance Associations Innovations in Technical Assistance program (MITA). This program takes a one-on-one approach to providing technical assistance through the MITA’s five areas of capacity building: strategic action planning, resource development and fundraising, organizational leadership, management, and accountability. ECBOs compete on a national level to receive technical assistance services from national technical assistance experts.

                Engage in Public Education and Advocacy

    ECDC uses outreach efforts (e-newsletter, daily news highlights) to educate/update subscribers on African refugee-related issues. During annual national conference, engage in advocacy through organizing visits to Capitol Hill where community members discuss issues with government officials.

     

                Conduct International Projects

    ECDC conducts humanitarian and development projects in the Horn of Africa, such as shipping books and educational materials to Ethiopia to rebuild its      previously deteriorated educational facilities. Out of this project grew the      Axumite Heritage Foundation (AHF) www.axumiteheritagefoundation.org, which renovated the damaged Governor’s Palace (the Inda Nebri’id) to turn it into a      public library. This program is now in the works of fundraising for a new Axumite Heritage Library.

    Executives:

                Tsehaye Teferra, President

                Allene Wright, Senior Vice President

                Azeb Tadesse, Director of Finance

    Branch Office Directors:

                Redda G. Mehari, ACC Las Vegas Managing Director

                Jennifer Gueddiche, ACC Denver Director

                Sarah Zullo, ACC D.C. Metro Managing Director

    National Program Staff:

                Anam Gnaho, Self Sufficiency Programs Manager

                Benaiah Duku, Program Officer

                Christa Ross, Programs Specialist

                Emily Nesheim Bullock, Refugee Resettlement Program Manager

                Katie Litanga, Program Officer

                Kevin Kelly, Enterprise Development Group Managing Director

                Kimberly Hughes Toft, Program Officer

                Lindsay Stepp, Program Officer

                Meron Seyoum, Database and Program Specialist

                Susan Kenney-Pfalzer, Program Officer

                Tseday Girma, Senior Program Officer

                Yeshareg Haileyesus, Program Specialist

                Wossenseged Hailu, IT Manager

    ECDC E-Newsletters: http://www.ecdcus.org/Publications/News_letter.html

    Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS)

    Mission: “HIAS rescues people whose lives are in danger for being who they are. We protect the most vulnerable refugees, helping them build new lives and reuniting them with their families in safety and freedom. We advocate for the protection of refugees and assure that displaced people are treated with the dignity they deserve. Guided by our Jewish values and history, we bring more than 130 years of expertise to our work with refugees.”

     

    Affiliates: (22 Refugee Assistance Organizations)

                California (5):

    Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles

    Jewish Family Service of San Diego

    Jewish Family and Children’s Services of San Francisco

    Jewish Family and Children’s Services of the East Bay

    Jewish Family Services of the Silicon Valley

                Florida (1):

    Gulf Coast Jewish Family and Community Services (Clearwater and Plantation)

                Illinois (1):

    Jewish Child and Family Services (Chicago)

                Maryland (2):

    Jewish Community Services (Baltimore)

    Jewish Social Service Agency (Rockville)

                Massachusetts (2):

    Jewish Family Service of Metrowest

    Jewish Family Service of Western Massachusetts

                Michigan (2):

    Jewish Family Service of Washtenaw County

    Jewish Family Service of Metro Detroit

                New Jersey (2):

    Jewish Vocational Service of MetroWest New Jersey

    Jewish Family and Vocational Service of Middlesex County

                New York (2):

    Jewish Family Service of Buffalo and Erie County

    FEGS Health and Human Services

                North Carolina (1):

    Carolina Refugee Resettlement Agency

                Ohio (1):

    US Together (Columbus, Cleveland, and Toledo)

                Pennsylvania (2):

    HIAS Pennsylvania

    Jewish Family and Children’s Services of Pittsburgh

                Washington (1):

    Jewish Family Service of Greater Seattle

    Funding Source:

                “The primary sources of revenue are: federal funding through U.S. Government Grants, operating grants, contributions and investment income, derived mainly from endowments,” (2012 Audit Report, 11). The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and other U.S. government grants comprise the federal funding sources.

     

    Program Areas of Focus

                Resettling Refugees

    HIAS welcomes and receives new Americans along with local social service organizations across the country, and provides immediate needs like a place to live, modest furniture, and groceries. Services like finding medical attention, enrolling children in school, and explaining the public transportation systems are also provided shortly after refugees’ arrival in the U.S. Additionally, HIAS provides short-term financial assistance toward rent, utilities, and clothing. Financial aid can be provided for up to five years after arrival if necessary.

                HIAS provides extended support after refugees’ arrival in the U.S. by working with local social service organizations to arrange employment counseling, English language courses, and assistance accessing vocational training, medical care, and mental health counseling.

                Legal Protection

    HIAS provides legal services that assist refugees in applying for resettlements in countries around the world, as well as providing free or discounted legal representation, counseling, and explaining legal rights to asylees. The Prins Program assists artists, scientists, scholars, and other professionals and their families seeking asylum with free legal representation.

                Psychosocial Care

    HIAS provides individual and group counseling in resettlement locations for refugees. Additionally, HIAS prevents further exploitation by maintaining programs in both refugee and host communities that make sure that all people respect every individual’s rights.

                Livelihood

    HIAS operates global programs that assist refugees in finding entrepreneurial opportunities, vocational training, and employment help.

                Advocacy

    Domestically, HIAS advocates for human rights, as well as the reform of the refugee resettlement process in the U.S. by removing unnecessary bureaucratic blockades to expedite the process.

                Internationally, HIAS works with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, the US Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration, other international refugee assistance organizations, as well as local and regional human rights groups to promote increased resettlement quotas, equality in resettlement countries (especially for the most vulnerable—women, children, LGBT persons), and to find additional funding for resettled refugees. UN Economic and Social Council allows HIAS to advocate for refugees within the UN.

    Leadership:

    Mark Hetfield, President & CEO

    Sussan Khozouri, Senior Vice President

    Francine S. Stein, Senior Advisor

    Farhan Irshad, Chief Financial Officer

    Melanie Nezer, Vice President, Policy & Advocacy

    Rabbi Jennie Rosenn, Vice President, Community Engagement

    Riva Silverman, Vice President, External Affairs

    Marina Belotserkovsky, Senior Director, Special Projects

    Aaron Gershowitz, Senior Director, U.S. Programs

    Rachel Levitan, Senior Counsel, Refugees and Migration

    Staff:

    Carolyn Bello, Director, Planning & Budgets

    Leah Bergen, Program Associate

    Lier Chen, Program Associate

    Igor Chubaryov, Program Associate

    Jane Daniello, Senior Director, Finance and Accounting

    Nikhat Dawson, Special Assistant, Finance and Accounting

    Janna Diamond, Special Assistant to the Vice President, Community Engagement

    Douglas Edelson, Director, Institutional Giving                                                           

    Lisa Habersham, Program Analyst

    Eileen Ho, Manager, Accounts Payable & Accounts Receivable

    Gene Lemire, Specialist, Travel Loans

    Liza Lieberman, Director, Advocacy & Outreach

    Marloucha Louina, Program Associate

    Lois McAllister, Database Administrator

    Stacie McCray, Director, Grants Management & Compilance

    Sabine McMullen, Director, Special Fundraising Campaigns

    Alexander Mero, Specialist, Planning and Budget

    Aleksander Milch, Staff Attorney

    Bethany Orlikowski, Program Assistant

    Harvey Paretzky, Associate Director, Post-Arrival

    Karen Pariti, Special Assistant to the Vice President, External Affairs

    Lisa Polakov, Director, Individual Giving & Development Operations

    Sherly Postnikov, Location Specialist

    Behnaz Radparvar, Program Associate

    Tatyana Rapaport, Senior Program Associate

    Tony Romeo, Office Manager

    Frank Rotondi, Director, Information Technology

    John Scimeme, Specialist, Grants Management and Compliance U.S. Programs

    Alla Shagalova, Associate Director, Pre-Arrival and Immigration

    Rachel Shulruf, Special Assistant to the President & Chief Executive Officer

    Edith Spiegel, Program Associate

    Dean Stewart, Associate Director, International Programs Finance

    Rebecca Stone, Director, Major Gifts

    Magnolia Turbidy, Program Manager, International Operations

    Zhanna Veyts, Director, Online Strategy & Engagement

    Amanda Wald, Special Assistant, Operations

    Simon Wettenhall, Lead Advocate

    Elizabeth Wojnar, Special Assistant to the Sr. Vice President

    Amy Yee, Associate Director, Payroll & Accounting

    Board:

    Robert D. Aronson, Director, Programs Committee Chair

    Jeffrey H. Blattner, Director

    Eugenia Brin, Director, Historical Records Task Force Chair

    Ann Cohen, Director, Governance Committee Chair

    Jane Ginns, Director

    Alexander Gordin, Director

    Lee M. Gordon, Director

    Albert Hayoun, Director

    Benita Fair Langsdorf, Director, Public Policy Committee Chair

    Rene Lerer, Secretary/Treasurer

    Dianne F. Lob, Vice Chair, Development Committee Chair

    Jamie F. Metzl, Director

    Neil Moss, Vice Chair

    Sanford K. Mozes, Director

    Sharon S. Nazarian, Director

    Alexis Ortiz, Director

    Eric Schwartz, Director

    Dale Schwartz, Chair of the Board

    Sandra Spinner, Director

    Yuli Wexler, Director, Relocation Task Force Chair

    Philip E. Woglin, Director

    International Rescue Committee (IRC)

    Mission: “The International Rescue Committee responds to the world’s worst humanitarian crises and helps people survive, recover and rebuild their lives. We restore safety, dignity and hope to millions who are uprooted and struggling to endure. The IRC leads the way from harm to home.” (Unofficial)

     

    Affiliates (4):

    New Roots: http://www.rescue.org/new-roots

    Rescue Gifts: http://gifts.rescue.org/

    IRC UK: http://www.rescue-uk.org/

    Women’s Refugee Commission: http://www.womensrefugeecommission.org/

     

    Field Offices (16): 

    Atlanta, GA: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-atlanta-ga

    Wichita, KS: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-wichita-ks

    Baltimore, MD: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-baltimore-md

    Boise, ID: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-boise-id

    Charlottesville, VA: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-charlottesville-va

    Dallas, TX (Abilene): http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-dallas-tx

    Los Angeles, CA: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-los-angeles-ca

    Miami, FL: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-miami-fl

    New York, NY (Elizabeth, NJ): http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-new-york-ny

    Phoenix, AZ: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-phoenix-az

    Salt Lake City, UT: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-salt-lake-city-ut

    San Diego, CA: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-san-diego-ca

    Northern California, CA: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-northern-california-ca

    Seattle, WA (SeaTac): http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-seattle-wa

    Tucson, AZ: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-tucson-az

    Silver Spring, MD: http://www.rescue.org/us-program/us-silver-spring

    Headquarters:

    New York, New York

    Washington D.C.

     

    Funding Source:

    IRC receives funding from US federal government grants, and donations from individuals, foundations, corporations, governments (from across the globe), nongovernmental organizations, and multilateral agencies.

                U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services provides funding for IRC’s citizenship and immigration services.

                The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration helps to fund the Resettlement Support Center in Thailand.

     

    Program Areas of Focus

                Resettlement services

    Staff and volunteers help recently arrived immigrants access housing, job placement and employment skills, clothing, medical attention, education, English-language classes, as well as community orientation.

                New Roots Program

    New Roots is a community gardening, nutrition education, and small-business farming program for new refugees.

                Immigration and Citizenship Services (Pathways to Citizenship Program)

    IRC assists refugees in achieving US citizenship with civics classes and low cost immigration legal services. Additionally the IRC helps refugees with the following: acquire Lawful Permanent Resident Status (Green Card) or Temporary Protected Status and Diversity Visa Lottery applications, reunite families through petitioning for family members to be granted refugee status in the US, access fee waivers for certain USCIS applications, assist with employment authorization, travel documents, and document replacement.

    Fighting Human Trafficking

    IRC provides case management services to all survivors of human trafficking,            helps survivors access shelter, financial assistance, employment counseling, skills training, health and dental care, legal and immigration services, assistance in becoming certified by the Department of Health and Human Services. The IRC also provides training to community service providers and allied professionals across disciplines to raise awareness and respond to needs of survivors

    Resettlement Support Center (based in Bangkok, Thailand)

    Helps primarily Burmese refugees (but also asylum seekers in Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and other countries in Southeast Asia) with US refugee applications, education about living in the US, as well as finds US organizations that can provide sponsorship to refugees.

     

    Staff Leadership Board:

    David Miliband, President and CEO

    George Biddle, Executive Vice President and Acting Head of Policy and        Practice

    Patricia Long, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

    Carrie Simon, General Counsel

    Jane Waterman, Senior Vice President, Europe

    Mania Boyder, Vice President, Leadership Gifts

    Sandra Mitchell, Vice President, International Programs

    Colleen Ryan, Vice President, Communications

    Jennifer Sime, Vice President, United States Programs

    Madlin Sadler, Chief of Staff

     

    Senior Leaders Group:

    Claran Donnelly, Acting Vice President Program Quality

    Eleanor Dougoud, Director International Programs Unit (UK)

    Denise Furnell, Director Global Safety and Security

    David Goodman, Chief Information Officer

    Ravi Gurumurthy, Vice President Strategy and Innovation

    Nancy Haitch, Vice President Strategic Development

    Mary Jane Jamar, Chief Human Resources Officer

    Scott McDonald, Director Institutional Philanthropy and Partnerships

    Stefanie Pfell, Director of External Relations (UK)

    Jason Phillips, Deputy Vice President International Programs

    Catherine Sykes, Senior Director Business Development Unit

    Sharon Waxman, Vice President Advocacy and Policy

    Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)

    Mission:

    Witnessing to God’s love for all people, we stand with and advocate for migrants and refugees, transforming communities through ministries of service and justice

    Funding Source:

    LIRS receives public funding from the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Refugee Resettlement and Administration for Children and Families, as well as the US Department of State Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration. In addition, LIRS receives donations from church bodies, foundations, corporations, and individuals as part of the Matching Grant program.

    Affiliates (3):

                Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA): http://www.elca.org/

                Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LC-MS): http://www.lcms.org/

                Latvian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (LELCA): http://www.lelba.org/

    Field Offices: 25 Agencies, 42 Offices

                Arizona

    Lutheran Social Services of the Southwest (Phoenix and Tuscon): http://www.lss-sw.org/

                California

    Interfaith Refugee and Immigration Service (Los Angeles): http://www.iris-la.org/

                Colorado

    Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains (Denver): http://www.lfsrm.org/

                Florida

    Lutheran Social Services of Northeast Florida (Jacksonville): http://www.lssjax.org/

    Lutheran Services Florida (Miami, Orlando, and Tampa): http://www.lssjax.org/

                Georgia         

    Lutheran Services of Georgia (Atlanta): http://www.lsga.org/

                Illinois

    RefugeeOne (Chicago): http://www.irim.org/

                Maryland

    Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area (Silver Spring): http://www.lssnca.org/

                Massachusetts

    Ascentria Care Alliance (West Springfield and Worcester): http://www.ascentria.org/

                Michigan

    Lutheran Social Services of Michigan (Battle Creek, Grand Rapids, and Southfield): http://www.lssm.org/

                Minnesota

    Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota (Minneapolis and Pelican Rapids): http://www.lssmn.org/

                Nebraska

    Lutheran Family Services of Nebraska (Omaha): http://www.lfsneb.org/

                New Hampshire

    Lutheran Social Services of New England (Concord): http://www.lssne.org/

                New Mexico

    Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains (Albuquerque): http://www.lfsrm.org/

                New York

    Lutheran Social Services of New York (New York City): http://www.lssny.org/

    Mohawk Valley Resource Center for Refugees (Utica): http://www.mvrcr.org/

                North Dakota

    Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota—Center for New Americans (Bismark, Fargo, and Grand Forks): http://www.lssnd.org/

                Oregon

    Lutheran Community Services Northwest (Portland): http://www.lcsnw.org/

                Pennsylvania

    Lutheran Children and Family Services of Eastern Pennsylvania (Lancaster and Philadelphia): http://www.lcfsinpa.org/

                South Carolina

    Lutheran Family Services in the Carolinas—Refugee Resettlement Program (Columbia): http://www.lfscarolinas.org/

                South Dakota

    Lutheran Social Services of South Dakota (Huron, Sioux Falls): http://www.lsssd.org/

                Texas

    Refugee Services of Texas (Dallas, Fort Worth, Austin, Amarillo, and Houston): http://www.rstx.org/

                Virginia

    Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area (Falls Church): http://www.lssnca.org/

                Washington

    Lutheran Community Services Northwest (Seattle and Vancouver): http://www.lcsnw.org/

                Wisconsin

    Lutheran Social Services of Wisconsin and Upper Michigan (Madison and Milwaukee): http://www.lsswis.org/

     

    Program Areas of Focus

                Refugee Resettlement

    LIRS provides new refugees with attaining housing, education, language classes, and employment, while additionally providing services like mental health care, professional re-certification assistance, and legal support.

                Higher: LIRS’s National Employment Initiative: http://www.higheradvantage.org/

    Higher assists resettled refugees in employment services by working with corporations, states, counties, agencies, ethnic-community based organizations, workforce development boards, and policy-makers across the country. For 15 years, Higher has been the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement’s training and technical assistance organization for resettled refugee employment and self-sufficiency.

                Advocacy for Children

    LIRS is one of two organizations in the world that provides foster care for unaccompanied refugee children. Migrant children leaving federal detention facilities are also included in this program. LIRS provides these children with mental and physical health services, educational programs, group activities, legal services, and family reunification if at all possible.

                Safe Release Support Program

    This program seeks to reunite migrant children with their families in the U.S. “Since 2006, LIRS Safe Support sites have served 75% of those who present themselves as potential caregivers for children in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement.” (http://lirs.org/our-work/people-we-serve/children/safe-release/­­ )

     

                Migrants Impacted by Detention

    LIRS assists migrants impacted by detention as they entered the U.S. through offering legal services (legal representation in asylum cases, Know Your Rights presentations, identification of torture survivors), visitation ministry, and community support through networking “local resources to support people released from detention so they are able to pursue their legal case in safety and dignity,” (http://lirs.org/our-work/people-we-serve/immigrantsfamilies/building-networks-of-support/)

     

    Leadership Team

    President and CEO: Linda Hartke

    Executive Vice President: Annie Wilson

    Vice President for Finance and Administration: Jane Anthon

    Vice President for Programs and Protection: Michael Mitchell

    Interim Vice President for Mission Advancement: Katrina Klettke-Straker

    Chief Information Officer: William Bisbee

    Chief Talent Officer: Tanya Weithers

    Executive Committee

    Board Chair: Mark A. Stuturd

    Vice Chair: William Swanson

    Board Secretary and Treasurer: Lori Fedyk

    Executive Member at Large: Rev. J. Bart Day

    Staff

    Executive Assistant to the President: Jamie McMillan

    Board Liaison: Eve Greco

    Project Coordinator for Network Engagement: Laura Griffin

    Director for Knowledge Management: Caitlin Moen

    Organizational Design Consultant: Deborah Redmond

    Director for Program Evaluation: Mette Brogden

    Business Manager: Heidi Pena

    Support Services Specialist: Terrance Faison

    Loans Manager: Terry Holthause

    Loans Operations Manager: Mindy Shinn

    Loans Counselor: Rana Al Mishlib

    Loans Counselor: Emma Meade

    Loans Assistant: Ann Fries

    Loans Assistant: Ann Reilly

    Director for Accounting and Finance: Deb Flavin

    Senior Accountant: Justyna Paez

    Staff Accountant: Denise Underwood

    Accounts Payable: Patricia Fraser

    Director for Grants Finance: Scott Sherman

    Affiliate Finance Manager: May Earl

    Accounting Clerk: Marianne Freedman

    Human Resource Manager: Julie Gilardi

    Human Resource Specialist: Monika Gil

    Manager for Infrastructure and Support: Cameron Wiley

    Help Desk Technician: Jonathan Joll

    Technical Business Analyst: Kathleen Neberman

    Technical Business Analyst: Darlene Boblooch

    IT Project Manager: Patrick Nowlan

    IT Project Manager: John Banks

    Software Support Analyst: Christopher Walton

    Programs and Protection Administrative Assistant: Sarah Vail

    Director for Refuge Resettlement: Terry Abeles

    Program Assistant: Stephanie Ward

    Assistant Director for Refugee Resettlement: Helen Molinaro

    Placement Coordinator: Sovanna Sok

    Placement Coordinator: Mia Thiam

    Director for Community Integration: Susan Gundlach

    Assistant Director for Community Integration: Suzanne Paszly

    Assistant Director for Community Integration: Christine Gedim

    Assistant Director for Community Integration: Angie Larenas

    Assistant Director for Community Integration: Rya Crafts

    Reporting Coordinator for Community Integration: Sharetta Barnes

    Training Development Specialist for Community Integration: Alicia Wrenn

    Program Assistant for Community Integration: Hannah Cann

    Assistant Director for Matching Grant: Myat Lin

    Quality Assurance Specialist: Belinda Castro

    Quality Assurance Coordinator: Ewurama Shaw-Taylor

    Quality Assurance Coordinator: Carroll Canipe

    Director for Children’s Services: Kimberly Haynes

    Administrative Assistant: Angela Randall

    Assistant Director for Children’s Services: Dawnya Underwood

    Senior Child Specialist: Sonia Hoffman

    Transitional Care Coordinator: Laura Schmidt

    Transitional Care Child Specialist: Olivia Hogle

    Child Specialist: Michael Lynch

    Child Specialist: Jasmine Shortridge

    Child Specialist: Stacy Tyrell

    Children’s Services Coordinator: Kristine Poplawski

    Children’s Services Program Specialist: Theresa Taylor

    Assistant Director for Foster Care and Permanency: Chak Ng

    Children’s Services Training and Research Specialist: Carrie McAvoy

    Placement Coordinator: Kerri Socha

    Placement Coordinator: Jade Jackson

    Safe Relsease Program Coordinator: Ginny Fitchett

    Children’s Specialist: Jessica Ranweiler

    Children’s Services Administrative Aid: Rhonda Eaton

    Children’s Services Intern: Morgan Pardue

    Director for Access to Justice: Liz Sweet, Esq.

    Staff Attorney: Angela Edman, Esq.

    National Network Coordinator: Matthew Dolamore

    Training and Research Coordinator: Julia Coffin

    Program Fellow for Access to Justice: Christina Andeweg

    Program Fellow for Access to Justice: Sarah Harrs

    Director for Higher: Rebecca Armstrong

    Research and Communications Specialist for Higher: Lorel Donaghey

    Director for Advocacy: Brittney Nystrom, Esq.

    Assistant Director for Advocacy: Joanne Kelsey

    Children and Youth Policy Associate: Jessica Jones, Esq.

    Policy Advocate: Rosalynd Erney

    Advocacy Fellow: Rebecca Eastwood

    National Grassroots Director: Folabi Olagbaju

    Director for Development: Katrina Klettke-Straker

    Data Manager for Development: Claudia McDonough

    Gift Officer: Paul Erbes

    Manager of Institutional Development: Katherine Ollenburger

    Director for Marketing and Communications: Tara Mulder

    Marketing Project Manager: Clarissa Perkins

    Assistant Director for Online Communications: Nicole Jurmo

    Manager for Congregational Outreach: Matt Herzberg

    Public Relations Officer: Miji Bell

    Community Education Facilitator: Fabio Lomelino

    Project Associate for Outreach: Amanda Chasey

    Communications Associate: Cecilia Pessoa

    U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB)

    Mission: Grounded by our belief in Jesus Christ and Catholic teaching, Migration and Refugee Services (MRS) fulfills the commitment of the U.S. Catholic bishops to protect the life and dignity of the human person. We serve and advocate for refugees, asylees, migrants, unaccompanied children, and victims of human trafficking.

    Funding Source:

     USCCB Migration and Refugee Services receives funding through grants from the U.S.

    government, as well as funding from the Catholic Relief Services Collection from parishes across the country, Passing on Hope Campaign, collection fees on travel loans, USCCB and foundation grants, and private donations. To receive federal funding, USCCB uses the federal appropriations process to advocate for the maximum funding allowed under the U.S. refugee program. USCCB is actively involved in the budgeting process, meeting with the Office of Management and Budget, congressional offices, and advisors to work in increasing the budget for the U.S. refugee program.

                Summary of funding the Refugee Program: http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-life-and-dignity/migrants-refugees-and-travelers/fundingtherefugeeprogram.cfm

                “The resettlement activities are financed by government agencies, principally the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of State under the authority of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended,” (Financial Statements 2013, 12).

         Specific programs’ funding sources:

    USCCB Travel loan program is funded by the Bureau for Population, Migration, and Refugees Family Reunification Program funded by Division of Unaccompanied Children's Services (DUCS) of the Office of Refugee Resettlement.

    Field Offices (150):

                See full list and addresses at: http://www.usccb.org/about/migration-and-refugee-services/diocesan-resettlement-and-unaccompanied-refugee-minors-offices.cfm

                Alabama (1 city):

    Mobile (Catholic Social Services Refugee Program, Catholic Social Services)

                Alaska (1 city):

    Anchorage (Catholic Social Services)

                Arizona (2 cities):

    Phoenix (Catholic Charities Community Services, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

    Tucson (Migration and Refugee Services of Catholic Social Service, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

                Arkansas (2 cities):

    Little Rock (Catholic Charities of Arkansas)

    Springdale/Diocese of Little Rock (Catholic Charities Immigration Services, Springdale)           

                California (9 cities):

    Los Angeles (Immigration and Refugee Department of Catholic Charities of Los Angeles, Resettlement Sub-Office of Immigration and Refugee Services)

    Oakland (Catholic Charities of East Bay)

    Orange (Catholic Charities of Orange County)

    Sacramento (Catholic Charities of Sacramento)

    San Bernardino (Catholic Charities San Bernardino/Riverside)

    San Diego (Catholic Charities)

    San Francisco (Catholic Charities/CRIS-Family & Immigrant Services, Catholic Charities CYO/Archdiocese of SF)

    San Jose (Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

    Santa Rosa (Immigration and Resettlement Services of Catholic Charities/Diocese of Santa Rosa)

                Connecticut (1 city):

    Hartford (Catholic Charities Migration & Refugee Services, Catholic Charities)

                Delaware (1 city):

    Wilmington (Catholic Charities Inc., Eastern Shore Social Services)

     

         Florida (8 cities):

    Miami (Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Miami Inc., Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

    Orlando (Catholic Charities of Central Florida Inc.)

    Palm Beach (Catholic Charities, Catholic Charities Diocese of Palm Beach)

    Pensacola/Tallahassee (Catholic Charities of NW Florida Inc.)

    Saint Augustine (Catholic Charities Bureau Inc.)

    Saint Petersburg (Catholic Charities DOSP Inc., Diocese of St. Petersburg Inc.)

    Venice (Catholic Charities Diocese of Venice, FL, Catholic Charities)

    Naples (Catholic Charities—sub-office of Venice)

                Georgia (1 city):

    Atlanta (Migration and Refugee Services of Catholic Charities of Atlanta Inc., Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Atlanta)

                Guam (1 city):

    Barrigada (Catholic Social Service http://css.guam.org/)

                Hawaii (1 city):

    Honolulu (Catholic Charities of Hawaii)

                Illinois (2 cities):

    Chicago (Catholic Charities)

    Rockford (Catholic Charities, Catholic Charities Immigration and Refugee Services www.ccrfd.org)

                Indiana (3 cities):

    Fort Wayne-South Bend (Catholic Charities of Fort Wayne-South Bend Inc., Catholic Charities)

    Gary (Catholic Charities http://www.catholic-charities.org/)

    Indianapolis (Catholic Charities Indianapolis)

         Iowa (2 cities):

    Des Moines (Catholic Charities)

    Dubuque (Catholic Charities)

                Kansas (3 cities):

    Dodge City (Catholic Agency for Migration & Refugee Services)

    Kansas City (Catholic Charities of Northeast Kansas Inc.)

    Wichita (Catholic Charities Inc. www.catholiccharitieswichita.org, Catholic Charities)

            

         Kentucky (1 city):

    Louisville (Catholic Charities http://www.catholiccharitieslouisville.org/migration.htm)

                Louisiana (4 cities):

    Alexandria (Resettlement Center of Central LA Inc.)

    Baton Rouge (Migration and Refugee Services of Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Baton Rouge)

    Lafayette (Migration & Refugee Services of Diocese of Lafayette)

    New Orleans (Catholic Charities of Archdiocese of New Orleans, Hispanic Apostolate Community Services and Immigration & Refugee Services)

         Maine (1 city):

    Portland (Catholic Charities Maine)

                Massachusetts (2 cities):

    Boston (Refugee & Immigration Services of Catholic Charities of Archdiocese of Boston)

    Worcester (Catholic Charities of Diocese of Worcester www.worcesterdiocese.org)

                Michigan (3 cities):

    Detroit (Office of Refugee Resettlement of Catholic Services of Macomb/Archdiocese of Detroit, Catholic Services of Macomb & Lapeer)

    Grand Rapids (Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

    Lansing (St. Vincent Catholic Charities Refugee Services)

                Minnesota (2 cities):

    Saint Paul & Minneapolis (Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Satin Paul and Minneapolis www.ccspm.org)

    Winona (Catholic Charities of Diocese of Winona http://www.ccwinona.org/programs/refugee_resettlement.php)

                Mississippi (2 cities):

    Biloxi (Migration and Refugee Center, Catholic Social & Community Services Inc.)

    Jackson (Catholic Charities, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

                Missouri (3 cities):

    Jefferson City (Diocese of Jefferson City)

    Columbia (Refugee & Immigration Services—sub-office of Jefferson City)

    Saint Louis (Catholic Charities Refugee Services)

                Nebraska (2 cities):

    Lincoln (Catholic Social Services)

    Hastings (Catholic Social Services—Sub-office of Lincoln)

                Nevada (1 city):

    Las Vegas (Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada Migration and Immigration Services, Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada)

                New Jersey (2 cities):

    Camden (Catholic Charities of Diocese of Camden)

    Trenton (Migration and Refugee Services/Diocese of Trenton http://www.dioceseoftrenton.org/justice/migration.asp, Aquinas Institute at Princeton University)

                New Mexico (1 city):

    Santa Fe/Albuquerque (Catholic Charities, Catholic Charities of Central New Mexico)

                New York (7 cities):

    Albany (Catholic Charities Housing Office)

    Brooklyn (Catholic Charities/Diocese of Brooklyn, Catholic Charities/Neighborhood Services)

    Buffalo (Catholic Charities of Buffalo http://www.ccwny.org/)

    New York (Catholic Charities Community Services)

    Rochester (Catholic Family Center, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

    Rockville Centre (Catholic Charities/Diocese of Rockville Centre, Migration Office of Catholic Charities www.catholiccharities.cc)

    Syracuse (Catholic Charities of Onondaga County, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

                North Carolina (1 city):

    Charlotte (Catholic Social Service of the Diocese of Charlotte Inc. www.cssnc.org)

                Ohio (3 cities):

    Cincinnati (Catholic Charities SW Ohio www.catholiccharitiesswo.org)

    Cleveland (Cleveland Catholic Charities Office of Migration and Refugee Services http://ccdocle.org/ccpcm/migration.htm, Catholic Charities Health and Human Services, Catholic Charities Parish & Community Ministries)

    Dayton (Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley www.cssmv.org)

                Oklahoma (2 cities):

    Oklahoma City (Catholic Charities)

    Tulsa (Catholic Charities)

                Oregon (1 city):

    Portland (Social Services/Catholic Charities, Catholic Charities Providing Help Creating Hope, Catholic Charities Inc. http://www.catholiccharitiesoregon.org/services_refugee_resettlement.asp)

                Pennsylvania (5 cities):

    Allentown (Immigration & Refugee Services of Catholic Charities/Diocese of Allentown, Catholic Charities of Diocese of Allentown)

    Erie (Catholic Charities Counseling and Adoption Services www.cccas.org, Catholic Charities)

    Harrisburg (Catholic Charities, Catholic Charities of Harrisburg, Pa.)

    Pittsburgh (Catholic Charities of Pittsburgh)

    Scranton (Catholic Social Services of the Diocese of Scranton)

                Puerto Rico (1 city):

    San Juan (Immigration Program, Caritas de Puerto Rico www.arquidiocesisdesanjuan.org)

                Rhode Island (1 city):

    Providence (Office of Community Services & Advocacy)

                Tennessee (2 cities):

    Memphis (Catholic Charities Inc.)

    Nashville (Refugee and Immigration Services of Catholic Charities of Tennessee Inc., Catholic Charities of Tennessee, Inc.)

                Texas (8 cities):

    Amarillo (Catholic Family Service, Inc.)

    Austin (Caritas of Austin)

    Corpus Christi (Catholic Charities of Corpus Christi www.goccn.org)

    Dallas (Catholic Charities of Dallas Inc., Refugee and Empowerment Services)

    El Paso (Diocesan Migrant and Refugee Services Inc.)

    Fort Worth (Catholic Charities/Diocese of Fort Worth Inc. www.ccdofw.org, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

    Galveston-Houston (Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Houston http://www.catholiccharities.org/, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

    San Antonio (Catholic Charities/Archdiocese of San Antonio)

                Utah (1 city):

    Salt Lake City (Catholic Community Services of Utah www.ccsutah.org)

                Virginia (4 cities):

    Arlington (Catholic Diocese of Arlington Migration & Refugee Services http://www.arlingtonrefugeeservices.com/, Catholic Charities Diocese of Arlington http://www.arlingtondiocese.org/)

    Richmond (Commonwealth Catholic Charities www.cccofva.org, Refugee Resettlement/Immigrant Services, Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

    Hampton Roads (Refugee and Immigrant Services of Commonwealth Catholic Charities—sub-office of Richmond)

    Roanoke (Refugee Resettlement/Immigrant Services—sub-office of Richmond)

                Washington (2 cities):

    Seattle (Catholic Refugee & Immigration Services www.ccsww.org, Catholic Community Services of Western Washington, Archdiocesan Housing Authority)

    Tacoma (Unaccompanied Refugee Minors Program)

                West Virginia (1 city):

    Wheeling-Charleston (Catholic Charities WVA Migration and Refugee Services http://www.dwc.org/)

         Wisconsin (3 cities):

    Green Bay (Refugee and Immigration Services of Catholic Charities)

    Milwaukee (Migrant and Refugee Services of Catholic Charities www.archmil.org, Catholic Charities)

    Sheboygan (Catholic Charities—sub-office of Milwaukee)

     

    Program Areas of Focus

                Refugee Resettlement

    “The Office of Resettlement Services Provides leadership direction for, and strategically

    manages, all refugee, Cuban/Haitian entrant and asylee populations-related programs

    administered by MRS.” This includes designing resettlement programs, developing

    policies to enhance these programs, developing financial management plans for refugees to use upon arrival in the US, assisting refugees in finding early employment, and overseeing the refugee travel loan program.

                Children’s Services

    USCCB/MRS is one of two VOLAGs authorized to resettle unaccompanied refugee

    children. MRS oversees the Unaccompanied Refugee Minor Program, which mages

    placement coordination, case and   program consultation, capacity development/training, research, and advocacy. MRS also manages the Safe Passages Family Reunification Program, which allows for the release of detained refugee children to long-term foster care or to their families if/when they are able to migrate to the US.

                Anti-Trafficking Program

    USCCB has worked to raise awareness and educate the public about human trafficking, as well as advocate and care for victims of human trafficking. The Dignity to Work Program assists victims in safely re-entering employment. The Amistad Program works to educate immigrant communities about human trafficking. USCCB has also received funding to help conduct a study titled After Rescue: Evaluation of Strategies to   Integrate Survivors of Trafficking, which will profile survivors and analyze the effectiveness of various programs, assistance, and interventions to reintegrate them into society.

                Migration Policy and Public Affairs

    USCCB MRS assists the bishops in developing policy positions on migration and human trafficking for use in parishes across the nation, as well as advocacy platforms for grassroots immigration reform campaigns. These objectives are accomplished through distributing informational papers among parishes, publishing reports that include policy proposals, issue public statements and Congressional Testimony, and organizing educational events like National Migration Week.

        USCCB connections to other educational/advocacy campaigns

    Justice for Immigrants http://www.justiceforimmigrants.org/about-us.shtml

    Coalition of Catholic Organizations Against Human Trafficking: http://www.usccb.org/about/anti-trafficking-program/coalition-of-catholic-organizations-against-human-trafficking.cfm

    Migration and Refugee Services Offices Staff

                Johnny Young, Executive Director

                Kevin Appleby, Director of the Office of Migration Policy and Public Affairs

                Anastasia Brown, Director of the Office of Resettlement Services

                Nathalie Lummert, Director of the Office of Special Programs

    U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI)

    Mission:

    “To protect the rights and address the needs of persons in forced or voluntary migration worldwide by advancing fair and humane public policy, facilitating and providing direct professional services, and promoting the full participation of migrants in community life.”

    Funding Source:

    Department of Health and Human Services Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) funds the Matching Grant program with private donors funding the “matched” investments. Partner agencies use these funds through training and services to secure suitable jobs, transportation, and child care for refugees in their first six months in the U.S.

    Field Offices (6):

    Albany, New York: http://www.refugees.org/about-us/where-we-work/albany/

    Des Moines, Iowa: http://www.refugees.org/about-us/where-we-work/uscri-des-moines/

    Detroit, Michigan: http://www.refugees.org/about-us/where-we-work/detroit/

    Erie, Pennsylvania: http://www.refugees.org/about-us/where-we-work/iie/

    Raleigh, North Carolina: http://www.refugees.org/about-us/where-we-work/north-carolina/

    Colchester, Vermont: http://www.refugees.org/about-us/where-we-work/vrrp/

     

    Affiliates (25 Partner Agencies):

    Akron, OH (International Institute of Akron): http://iiakron.org/

    Binghamton, NY (American Civic Association): http://www.americancivic.com/

    Boston, MA (International Institute of Boston): http://iine.us/

    Bowling Green, KY (Western Kentucky Refugee Mutual Assistance Association): http://www.immigrationrefugeeservices.org/wkrmaa.html

    Brooklyn, NY (CAMBA): http://www.camba.org/Default.aspx

    Buffalo, NY (International Institute of Buffalo): http://www.iibuff.org/

    Chicago, IL (Heartland Alliance): http://www.heartlandalliance.org/

    Cleveland, OH (International Services Center): http://www.internationalservicescenter.org/

    Derby, CT (International Institute of Connecticut): http://www.iiconn.org/

    Glendale, CA (International Institute of Los Angeles): http://www.iilosangeles.org/

    Honolulu, HI (Pacific Gateway Center): http://www.pacificgatewaycenter.org/portal/default.aspx

    Houston, TX (YMCA International Services): http://www.ymcahouston.org/

    Kansas City, MO (Jewish Vocational Services): http://www.jvskc.org/

    Lowell, MA (International Institute of Lowell): http://iine.us/

    Manchester, NH (International Institute of New Hampshire): http://iine.us/

    Miami, FL (Youth Co-op, Inc.): http://www.ycoop.org/en/

    Milwaukee, WI (International Institute of Wisconsin): http://www.iiwisconsin.org/

    Owensboro, KY (Western Kentucky Refugee Mutual Assistance Association): http://oirs.owbky.com/reception.htm

    Palm Springs, FL (Youth Co-op, Inc.): http://www.ycoop.org/en/

    Philadelphia, PA (Nationalities Service Center): http://www.nationalitiesservice.org/

    Pittsburgh, PA (Northern Area Multi-Service Center): http://www.northernareacompanies.com/

    Providence, RI (International Institute of Rhode Island): http://www.iiri.org/

    St. Louis, MO (International Institute of St. Louis): http://www.iistl.org/

    St. Paul, MN (International Institute of Minnesota): http://www.iimn.org/

    Twin Falls, ID (College of Southern Idaho Refugee Service Center): http://refugeecenter.csi.edu/

    Program Areas of Focus

         Matching Grant program

    Organized through a hierarchy of responsibilities. USCRI has the overarching umbrella of responsibility, as it coordinates with ORR, state and local agencies, employers, and partner agencies to ensure that the program is achieving its objectives. Partner agencies work directly with clients, using the program funds for training and services to secure suitable jobs, transportation, and childcare for refugees in their first six months in the U.S. Community members (volunteers, donors, employers) participate in the Matching Grant program by working with clients both directly and indirectly. Tutoring, training, and employment demonstrate some of the direct forms of participation, while donations of goods and/or financial resources show a more indirect form of participation.

                The Reception and Placement program (through U.S. Department of State) Helps to resettle refugees in their new communities. USCRI is one of nine nongovernmental agencies that can resettle refugees through this program.

                The Preferred Communities Program

    Implemented in communities that can provide opportunities for refugees to succeed and become financially independent. USCRI and ORR maintain the general implantation measures, while partner agencies work directly with clients to form local partnerships that can connect clients to opportunities.

                The Study of Domestic Capacity to Provide Medical Care for Vulnerable Refugees Promoting Refugee Health and Well-Being program ultimately researches the domestic capacity to provide health care to refugees. This research can then help to influence policy decisions.

                USCRI upholds international partnerships, as well as a Warehousing Campaign that aim to protect the rights of refugees.

                To protect immigrant children, USCRI maintains multiple programs and campaigns, including the online I am Solo Campaign (educating the public about immigrant children), as well as the Immigrant Children Legal Program. This program uses pro bono attorneys to provide immigrant children with the legal services necessary for adequate representation. This program works with over 275 law firms across the U.S.

                USCRI partially oversees the National Human Trafficking Victim Assistance Program, which aims to provide the case management services necessary to assist victims in becoming certified under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as a human trafficking victim.

    USCRI Executives:

    Lavinia Limón, President & Chief Executive Officer

    Lee Williams, Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

    Saba Berhane, Director of Programs

    Stacie Blake, Director of Government and Community Relations

    Peter Limón, Director of Business Development

    Wony Pak, Director of Management of Information Systems

    Alison Seiler, Director of Administration

    USCRI Board:

    Scott Wu, Chair

    Gene DeFelice, Vice Chair

    Lawrence M. Rosenthal, Treasurer

    Mindy W. Saffer, Secretary, LEED AP Principal

    Members: Thomas H. Belote, Esq., Kenneth Blackman, Edward Grode, Ken Leung, John Monahan, Lily O’Boyle, Donna Scarlatelli, William Shuey, Sam Udani, James Hathaway

    USCRI Field Office Directors:

    Tawfik Alazem, Detroit

    Dylanna Jackson, Erie

    Amila Merdzanovic, Vermont

    Jilly Peckenpaugh, Albany

    Robert Warwick, Des Moines

    USCRI Global Ambassador: Jeff Fahey

    World Relief (WR)

    Mission:

    Empowering the local Church to serve the most vulnerable.

    Funding Source:

    World Relief primarily receives funding from private donations, government grants, and MED banking revenue. Specific program funding: Reception and Placement program is funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration. Matching Grant program is funded $2 to $1 by the Office of Refugee Resettlement and private donations.

    Field Offices (25):

                California

    Modesto: http://worldreliefmodesto.org/

    Sacramento: http://worldreliefsacramento.org/

    Garden Grove: http://worldreliefgardengrove.org/

                Florida

    Jacksonville: http://worldreliefjacksonville.org/

    Miami: http://worldrelief.org/Page.aspx?pid=2743&frcrld=1

    Tampa: http://worldrelieftampa.org/

                Georgia

    Atlanta: http://worldreliefatlanta.org/

                Idaho

    Boise: http://worldreliefboise.org/

                Illinois

    Aurora: http://worldreliefaurora.org/

    Chicago: http://worldreliefchicago.org/

    DuPage: http://worldreliefdupage.org/

    Moline: http://worldreliefmoline.org/

                Maryland

    Anne Arundel: http://worldreliefannearundel.org/

    Baltimore: http://worldrelief.org/Page.aspx?pid=2762

                Minnesota

    Minneapolis-St. Paul: http://worldrelief.org/Page.aspx?pid=2753

                North Carolina

    High Point: http://worldreliefhighpoint.org/

    Durham: http://worldreliefdurham.org/

                Ohio

    Columbus: http://worldreliefcolumbus.org/

                Tennessee

    Memphis: http://worldreliefmemphis.org/

    Nashville: http://worldreliefnashville.org/

                Texas

    Fort Worth: http://worldrelieffortworth.org/

                Washington

    Tri-Cities: http://worldrelieftricities.org/

    Seattle (Kent): http://worldreliefseattle.org/

    Spokane: http://worldreliefspokane.org/

                Wisconsin

    Fox Valley: http://worldrelieffoxvalley.org/

     

    Affiliates (9 Partners):

    Accord Network: http://www.accordnetwork.org/history/

    Micah Network: http://www.micahnetwork.org/

    ONE: http://www.one.org/

    Integral: http://www.integralalliance.org/

    Faith Alliance Against Slavery and Trafficking: http://www.faastinternational.org/

    Global AIDS: http://www.belong2it.com/gapp/default.asp

    CORE: http://www.coregroup.org/

    InterAction: http://www.interaction.org/

    Refugee Council USA: http://www.rcusa.org/

      

    Program Areas of Focus

                Disaster Response

    World Relief provides disaster assistance depending on the crisis at hand. Assistance could come in the form of funding, proposals, technical assistance, training, mentorship, or project identification/implementation. Often times World Relief works through local churches to provide food, clothing, blankets, shelter, or emotional support/counseling for their own communities.

                Child Development

    World Relief provides educational services in Cambodia, Mozambique, and Malawi that teach children about health and hygiene, conflict resolution, and Bible stories.

                Maternal & Child Health

    World Relief works with the church, grassroots communities and government health services through the Care Relief Model to address poverty-related health problems. This model requires 10-15 volunteers to go out into communities and educate their neighbors about these problems, with an objective to disperse the information by asking their neighbors to pass the education on to their neighbors, and so on.

                HIV/AIDS

    World Relief primarily promotes abstinence and mutual fidelity in marriage to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS, as well as connecting HIV positive women with health services, educating the public about HIV testing, and implementing interactive peer-based learning to curb the spread of HIV in young people specifically. World Relief also helps church groups provide in-home care to those affected by HIV/AIDS, support orphaned children, and promote economic strengthening.

                Agricultural Development

    World Relief educates subsistence farmers about innovative and cost-effective farming techniques (like crop rotation, irrigation, and farming cooperatives), as well as connecting farmers to national and international markets.

                Immigrant Legal Services

    The Immigration Legal Services Technical Unit of World Relief assists local churches in providing legal services to refugees through immigrant law trainings and the “discernment of immigrant legal ministry, education surrounding church-based immigrant legal services clinics, training opportunities for church-based clinic sites, and staff/volunteers, and programmatic start up and support for these sites.”

                Microfinance

    World Relief helps to provide non-profit loans through local micro-finance institutions, as well as the training and support to accompany them.

         Anti-Trafficking

    World Relief has helped start Faith Alliance Against Slavery and Trafficking. This group of Christian organizations has developed programs, curriculums, and training to prevent trafficking, as well as assistance and support to survivors of trafficking.

         Refugee Resettlement

    Reception and Placement: For refugees’ first 30-90 days in the U.S., World Relief helps them to apply for a social security card, get an initial health screening, sign up for school/English classes, attend cultural information seminars, and adapt to public services.

         Matching Grant

    World Relief provides social and employment services for newly arrived refugees, as well as providing temporary cash assistance and rent and utility assistance.

         Employment Services

    World Relief provides employment training, services to help refugees find employment, and support for both employers and refugees in overcoming potential obstacles.

         Travel Loans

    World Relief provides travel loan services to refugees.

    Leadership:

                Stephan Bauman, President and Chief Executive Officer

                Barry Howard, CFO/SVP of Finance, Human Resources and Administration

                Kevin Sanderson, SVP International Programs and Chief Information Officer

                Dan Kosten, SVP U.S. Programs

                Gil Odendaal, Ph.D., D.Min, Senior Vice President of Integral Mission

                Eeva Sallinen Simard, Chief of Staff

                John Gichinga, Director of Spiritual Formation

                Jenny Yang, VP of Advocacy and Policy

    World Relief Board of Directors:

    Mr. Steve Moore, Chairman

    Rev. Sanders “Sandy” Wilson, Vice Chairman

    Mrs. Kathryn Vaselkiv, Treasurer

    Casely Essamuah, Rev. Secretary of the Board

    Rev. Leith Anderson (National Association of Evangelicals)

    Rev. Paul Borthwick (Development Associates International)

    Katherine Barnhart

    Dr. Judith Dean (Brandeis University)

    Stephen Simms (Simms Showers LLP)

    Dr. Timothy Ek

    David Husby (Covenant World Relief)

    Tim Breene

    Dr. Roy Taylor (National Association of Evangelicals)

    Bill Westrate (Veolia Environmental Services)

    Tim Traudt (Wells Fargo)


Why Small Cities

Where Are Refugees Being Resettled

Interviews and Surveys